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Bellevue Chamber 2020 Legislative Session – 2020 End of Session Report

2020 Session Summary

At 8:00pm on March 12th, the legislature adjourned the 2020 legislative session sine die. The 2020 Washington State legislative session was a short session, which means it moved at a rapid pace as legislators worked diligently to pass bills and end on time.

While the closing floor sessions included the normal end of session celebrations, expressions of gratitude to staff, honoring of retiring legislators, and lots of photographs, there was also an underlying somber tone with the reality of the coronavirus outbreak and the unknown impact on the state. One of the last bills to pass both chambers was HB 2965 - Concerning the state's response to the novel coronavirus, which appropriated $200 million from the budget stabilization account (also known as the rainy day fund) for coronavirus response. The operating budget was also passed by both chambers on the last day, and several of the floor speeches by members spoke to the gravity of the situation created by the outbreak and the potential impact on the people and economy of our state.

We do not yet have a final tally of how many total bills passed during the 2019 session. We will track that down and include it in the next monthly report. Here is an update on the numbers at each cutoff:

  • Over 2,400 bills have been introduced so far this session.
  • About 1,500 bills made it through the house of origin policy cutoff.

Budgets

Operating Budget

The final 2020 supplemental budget (SB 6168) increases net new Near General Fund - State plus Opportunity Pathways (NGF-O) spending by $961 million, or approximately 1.8 percent over the enacted 2019-21 budget. The $961 million includes the $121 million in current obligations (case load changes, mandatory cost adjustments, etc), as well as $839 million in net new spending. This proposal would bring NGF-O spending to

$53.5 billion in 2019-21.

In addition to the $961 million in new spending, the Legislature, through HB 2965, spends $200 million from the Budget Stabilization Account (Rainy Day Fund) for emergency response efforts related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

The emergence of the coronavirus outbreak during session created a shifting landscape for budget writers. In their summary of the final operating budget, budget writers provided some important context for where the final budget landed:

During the 2020 legislative session, the coronavirus (Covid-19) began to spread. At the time the final budget is voted upon, the full impacts to public health and the state economy was unknown. The uncertainty related to Covid-19 has been such that the February 2020 economic, revenue and caseload forecasts have not picked up any potential effects. Prior to the COVID-19 outbreak, the 2020

Legislature started the 2020 supplemental budget process with an additional $1.5 billion in NGF-O from revenue forecasts that were higher than expected in the 2019-21 biennium. Over the same time period, the projected costs for continuing current programs and other mandatory cost adjustments increased by $121 million. These mandatory costs do not include new fiscal or policy-related changes, or any actions related to the COVID-19 virus.

With this context in mind, the final operating budget investments were slightly reduced from both the House and Senate budget proposal funding levels. The final budget leaves $3 billion in total reserves at the end of the biennium, the largest balance in state history. Over the four-year outlook, the reserves are expected to grow

to $3.6 billion. Senate Ways & Means Chair Christine Rolfes summarized the final budget well: “It’s a plan that balances our needs with fiscal discipline. We’ve done our best to prepare our state for an uncertain, volatile

economy.”

The Final budget also includes the following policy-related spending increases:

  • $200 million to cover costs associated with the coronavirus outbreak, including a dedicated call center, monitoring, testing and support for local health jurisdictions.
  • $160 million to address homelessness and affordable housing.
  • $50 million to address the climate crisis by investing in communities and projects to enhance mitigation and resilience.
  • $153 million to the state Department of Children and Families to reduce childcare rates for working families ($65M), strengthen the foster care system ($52M), expand early learning programs ($15M), and other increases.
  • $172 million for K-12 education in the form of local levy assistance ($46M), counselors in high poverty schools ($32M), special education ($2M), pupil transportation ($41M), paraeducator training ($14M), student mental health and safety ($3M), and other increases.
  • Health care: Investments in primary care physician rate increases ($10M), rural health clinics ($34M), family planning ($8M), foundational public health ($17M), and other increases.

Operating Budget Documents: Operating Budget Bill: SB 6168 One Page Comparison

Overview (Overviews, Four-Year Outlook, Revenue Bills, Report Summaries) Statewide Summary and Agency Detail

Transportation Budget

The Legislature passed the supplemental transportation budget, which includes $10.3 billion in appropriation authority, a net increase of $450 million. It addresses the passage of Initiative 976, which has resulted in a loss of revenue to the state of $453 million. This loss in revenue increases in magnitude to $684 million in the 2021- 23 biennium once fully phased in. The final utilized one-time transfers, adjustments, and the usage of underspent dollars due to deferred projects to balance the budget. The budget did not make the extensive cuts that were anticipated heading into session, and still believed by many to be coming in the long-term. The chairs of both Transportation Committee chairs were clear in their statements when they released their

budget proposals that they do not address the ‘larger, long-term transportation budget crisis’. The longer-term solutions are left to the legislature to address in the next session. This path is well summarized in the

statement from House Transportation Chair Representative Jake Fey: “There were a number of moves in this budget designed to reduce and mitigate the harm of Initiative 976. Some may see this budget proposal and point to it as evidence that the revenue cuts aren’t so bad. I want people to be aware that this proposal tries hard to prevent short-term damage. Lawmakers will have to deal with the long-term problems in revenue losses next session when we write a new two-year budget.” Senate Transportation Chair Senator Steve Hobbs echoed these sentiments in his statement, saying: “We had to get creative to make sure the state’s priorities were met. Moving money around like this is something that can only be done once. We are looking at a

significant budget shortfall in January [2021] without new revenue.”

Capital Budget Documents: Transportation Budget Bill: HB 2322 Agency Summary

Agency Detail

Stand Alone Budget Items That Were Funded

Budget items are sorted by agency

2020 SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATING BUDGET

The items below are stand-alone budget items that were funded but not associated with legislation that passed.

Department of Commerce

Industrial Waste Program: $500,000 GFS

Funding is provided to implement Senate Bill No. 6430 (industrial waste program), which creates the program and funds grants for industrial waste coordination. (General Fund-State) (Ongoing)

Housing & Essential Needs: $15 mil GFS

Additional HEN funding is provided to be tightly targeted to unsheltered individuals and people currently residing in homeless shelters. (General Fund-State) (One-Time)

Homeless Youth Housing Stability: $1.007 mil GFS

Funding is provided for a pilot program to create 15 transitional housing beds with no time limit for non-state dependent youth ages 16 and 17. (General Fund-State) (Ongoing)

Surplus Property Affordable Housing: $172,000 GFS

The Department of Commerce is directed by RCW 43.63A.510 to work with six state agencies to catalog surplus real estate property suitable for development into affordable housing for low-income households and provide an annual report on its findings to the Legislature. Ongoing funding is provided for the report. (General Fund-State)(Ongoing)

Youth Behavioral Health Grant: $400,000 GFS

Funding is provided for a competitive grant for behavioral support services for youth in crisis. (General Fund- State) (One-Time)

Diversion Services: $1 mil GFS

Funding is provided for diversion services to homeless individuals or individuals at risk of becoming homeless (General Fund-State) (Ongoing)

GMA Comprehensive Plan Updates: $100,000 GFS

Funding is provided for implementation of Engrossed Substitute House Bill 2342 (comprehensive plan updates), including developing rules and guidance for local governments. (General Fund-State) (Ongoing)

HMIS Staffing: $700,000 GFS

Funding is provided for staff who support the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS). (GeneralFund-State) (One-Time)

Homeless/At-Risk Women: $75,000 GFS

Funding is provided for a grant to a nonprofit serving pregnant women, single mothers, and their children who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. The grant must be used to provide classes relating to financial literacy, renter rights and responsibilities, parenting, and physical and behavioral health. (General Fund- State)(One-Time)

Housing & Homelessness Capital: $40 million non-GFS

Funding is provided for homelessness and housing related capital projects. (Washington Housing Trust Account-State) (One-Time)

Preservation & Maintenance: $5 million non-GFS

Funding is provided for preservation and maintenance of affordable housing. (Washington Housing Trust Account-State) (One-Time)

Rapid Response: $10 million non-GFS

Funding is provided for preservation of affordable housing at risk of losing affordability. (Washington Housing Trust Account-State) (One-Time)

Statewide Emission Reduction Analysis: $600,000 GFS

Funding is provided to contract for a comprehensive analysis of statewide emission reduction strategies. (General Fund-State) (One-Time)

Supportive Housing: $15 mil GFS

Funding is provided for permanent supportive housing assistance grants to support operations, maintenance, and service costs of permanent supportive housing units. (General Fund-State) (Ongoing)

Affordable Housing Benchmarks: $184,000 GFS

Funding is provided to publish information on statewide affordable housing benchmarks. (General Fund-State) (One-Time)

Increase Shelter Capacity: $60 million GFS

Funding is provided for a grant program to increase shelter capacity in cities and counties. (Home Security FundAccount-State) (One-Time)

Housing Needs Pilot Program: $5 million GFS

Funding is provided for a pilot program to address the immediate housing needs of low- or extremely low- income elderly or disabled adults living in certain counties. (General Fund-State) (One-Time)

Growth Management Workgroup: $350,000 GFS

Funding is provided for a workgroup for growth management stakeholders in light of the recent Ruckelshaus Center report. (General Fund-State) (One-Time)

Foreclosure Prevention Services: $607,000 GFS

Funding is provided to support the work of the Washington Homeownership Resource Center. (General FundState) (Ongoing)

Washington State Health Care Authority - Health Benefit Exchange

Individual Market Assessment: $100,000 GFS

One-time funding is provided for HBE to contract with an independent actuarial consultant to conduct a market assessment of the impact of a state requirement for individuals to enroll in health coverage. (General FundState) (One-Time)

WA State Criminal Justice Training Commission

Basic Law Enforcement Academy: $1.48 million

One-time funding is provided for two additional Basic Law Enforcement Academy classes in FY 2020 and FY 2021 to meet demands from local law enforcement agencies for basic peace officer training. The increased number of classes, from ten to 21, will provide training for 330 additional students annually. (General Fund- State; General Fund-Local) (One-Time)

Seattle/King/Snohomish BLEA: $102,000

Local funding authority is provided for the Criminal Justice Training Commission to contract with the Seattle Police Department and the King County and Snohomish County Sheriff's Offices to hold a basic law enforcement academy session that will be fully funded by these agencies. (General Fund-Local) (One-Time)

Department of Ecology

Plastic Bags: $283,000 non-GFS

Funding is provided for implementing the provisions of SB 5323 (Plastic Bags). (Waste Reduction/Recycling/Litter Control-State) (Custom)

Clean Energy: $502,000 GFS

The 2019-21 budget provided funding for the department to implement the Clean Energy Act, Chapter 288, Laws of 2019 (E2SSB 5116), which transitions Washington's electric utilities to carbon neutrality starting in 2030.Additional funding allows the department to conduct greenhouse gas content calculation rulemaking, establish emission rates for unspecified electricity, and develop energy transformation project requirements. The department will conduct a lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions analysis of waste management practices and participate in the transmission corridors work group. (General Fund-State) (Custom)

Voluntary Cleanups: $668,000 non-GFS

Additional funding is provided on an ongoing basis for the Voluntary Cleanup Program, in which Ecology provides contaminated site owners with technical assistance and opinions on cleanup sufficiency. (Model Toxics Control Operating Account-State) (Ongoing)

Puget Sound Freshwater Monitoring: $748,000 non-GFS

A combination of one-time and ongoing funding is provided to add capacity for continuous freshwater nutrient monitoring for dissolved oxygen, pH, nitrates, turbidity, temperature and conductivity, and targeted storm event sampling at the mouth of the seven largest rivers discharging into Puget Sound. The data collected will support a nutrient reduction strategy for Puget Sound and help inform decisions regarding the need for future infrastructure investments across the region. (Model Toxics Control Operating Account-State) (Custom)

Cleanup and Study PFAS Contamination: $1.036 million non-GFS

One-time funding is increased to add analytical capacity relating to per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), sample wastewaters and biosolids at three municipal wastewater treatment facilities receiving industrial discharges. Funding is also provided for cleanup technical assistance to communities impacted by PFAS contamination in their water supply systems. (Model Toxics Control Operating Account-State) (One-Time)

Local Source Control Program: $750,000 non-GFS

The Department of Ecology's Local Source Control Program provides funding to local governments who provide hands-on technical and regulatory assistance to small businesses. A combination of one-time and ongoing funding is provided to replace a federal grant which ended in FY2019. (Model Toxics Control Operating Account-State) (Custom)

WCC Local Partnerships: $3.658 million non-GFS

Increased authority in GF-local allows the use of Washington Conservation Corp crews for services like invasive weed control, constructing trails, etc. at the local level. (General Fund-Local) (Custom)

Crude Oil Volatility Litigation: $605,00 non-GFS

North Dakota and Montana filed a petition with the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) seeking a preemption declaration for Chapter 354, Laws of 2019 (ESSB 5579), which contains vapor pressure limits for in-state receipt of crude oil by rail. North Dakota may also file a federal lawsuit challenging the law on Commerce Clause grounds. One-time funding is provided for potential legal costs in FY2020. (Model Toxics Control Operating Account-State) (One-Time)

Oil Spills Program: $3.5 million non-GFS

Funds are shifted from the Model Toxics Control Operating account and the Oil Spill Prevention Account to the Oil Spill Response Account (OSRA)to stabilize the OSRA account. Funding is restored for equipment cache grants with were depleted due to response costs of the Olympia brewery site incident. (Oil Spill Prevention Account-State; Oil Spill Response Account-State; Model Toxics Control Operating Account-State) (Custom)

Water Quality Permit Review: $654,000 non-GFS

Contingent on federal rulemaking that would shorten the review period for Clean Water Act permits, ongoing funding is provided for additional staff for permit reviews. (Model Toxics Control Operating Account- State)(Ongoing)

Zero Emission Vehicle Program: $149,000 GFS

Ongoing funding is provided to implement the provisions of SB 5811 (Clean car standards & prog). (General Fund-State)(Ongoing)

GHG Emissions Evaluation: $2.33 million non-GFS

Major energy facilities and other infrastructure projects must undergo environmental review in permitting, including review of climate impacts. Funds are provided through FY2022 for the Department to adopt rules to standardize the consideration of climate change risk, vulnerabilities, and greenhouse gas emissions in environmental assessments for projects with significant environmental impacts. (Model Toxics Control Operating Account-State) (Custom)

Local Solid Waste Financial Assistance: $7 million non-GFS

Ongoing funding is provided for the Local Solid Waste Financial Assistance program, which will increase funding provided for county solid waste management programs such as recycling, trash collection, and hazardous waste cleanup. (Model Toxics Control Operating Account-State) (Ongoing)

Recreation and Conservation Office

Carbon Sequestration: $68,000 GFS

Funding is provided in FY2021 and FY2022 to incorporate carbon sequestration into agency operations, contracting, and grant-making, as described in Engrossed Second Substitute House Bill 2311 (Greenhouse gas emissions). (General Fund-State) (Custom)

Department of Natural Resources

Fire Suppression: $24.968 million GFS

One-time funding is provided for actual and estimated costs for fire suppression in FY2020 that have exceeded the funding for this purpose in the 2019-21 enacted budget. Funding is also made available for responding to other emergencies such as caused by COVID-19. (General Fund-State) (One-Time)

Special Appropriations to the Governor

Foundational Public Health: $28 mil total

The 2019-21 enacted budget appropriated $10.0 M from the state general fund and $12.0 M from the Foundational Public Health Services Account (FPHSA) for foundational public health services, as defined in Chapter 14, Laws of 2019 (2SHB 1497). Revenue to the FPHSA is below projections. Funding for foundational public health services is partly shifted from the FPHSA to the state general fund on an ongoing basis. In addition, $3.0 M/FY state general fund is provided for foundational public health services beginning in FY20. (General Fund-State; Foundational Public Health Services-State) (Custom)

2020 SUPPLEMENTAL TRANSPORTATION BUDGET

The Legislature passed the supplemental transportation budget on March 11th and includes $10.3 billion in appropriation authority, a net increase of $450 million. It addresses the passage of Initiative 976, which has resulted in a loss of revenue to the state of $453 million. This loss in revenue increases in magnitude to $684 million in the 2021-23 biennium once fully phased in.

University of Washington:

Washington Ferries Workforce Study: $250,000

Funding is provided for an analysis of workforce development needs of the Washington State Ferry system. Funding is provided for the Foster School of Business at the University of Washington to conduct the study.(Motor Vehicle Account-State) (One-Time)

Joint Transportation Committee

Statewide Needs Assessment

Adds an item to the scope of work by the statewide needs assessment workgroup that looks at whether a revision to the statewide transportation policy goals in RCW 47.04.280 is warranted.

Private Auto Ferry: $250,000

Conduct a study of the feasibility of a private auto ferry between Washington and British Columbia. A report is due to the transportation committees of the legislature by February 15, 2021.

Transportation Commission

Road Usage Charge Committee

Adds to the scope of work to create a framework for modeling the effects of a road usage charge on passenger and light-duty vehicles including, but not limited to, plug-in electric vehicles, autonomous vehicles, state fleets, and transportation network companies; identify and measure potential disparate impacts of a road usage charge on designated populations, including communities of color, low-income households, vulnerable populations, and displaced communities.

Road Usage Charge Equity Impacts: $150,000

Funding is provided for the WSTC to conduct an analysis of potential impacts of a road usage charge on communities of color, low-income households, vulnerable populations, and displaced communities, with funds held in unallotted status by the Office of Financial Management to be released only once the WSTC has

exhausted efforts to secure federal funds for road usage charge study if the WSTC has been unsuccessful in obtaining this federal funding. (Motor Vehicle Account-State) (One-Time)

Washington State Patrol

Toxicology Laboratory Staffing: $1.8 million

Funding is provided for additional staff and associated office space to address an increasing backlog of impaired driving cases at the state toxicology lab. (State Patrol Highway Account-State) (Custom)

Department of Licensing

Initiative 976

The Department of Licensing working with OFM shall provide a monthly report on the number of registrations involved and differences between actual collections and collections if the initiative was not subject to a temporary injunction as of December 5, 2019.

Sound Transit Reimbursement: $7.1 million

Beginning in fiscal year 2021, funding is adjusted based on Sound Transit paying for the full costs associated with the administration and collection of the Motor Vehicle Excise Tax. This results in a decrease of $7.1 million in Motor Vehicle Account-State funds and an increase of $7.1 million in Motor Vehicle Account-Local funds (Motor Vehicle Account-State; Motor Vehicle Account-Local) (Ongoing)

Payment Plan Option: $40,000

Funding is provided for the development of a plan to allow vehicles owners to voluntarily enter into either quarterly or monthly payments for vehicle fees or taxes. DOL must submit a report to the Governor and chairs of the transportation committees of the Legislature by December 1, 2020. (DOL Services Account-State) (One- Time)

WSDOT: Transportation Planning – Program T

Performance Based Evaluation

Within available resources, by December 31, 2020, the department shall provide to the governor and the transportation committees of the legislature a report examining the feasibility of doing performance-based evaluations for projects. The department must incorporate feedback from stakeholder groups, including traditionally underserved and historically disadvantaged populations, and the report shall include the project evaluation procedure that would be used for the performance-based evaluation.

Additional Local/Federal Authority: $6.3 million

Federal and local appropriation authority is provided for WSDOT for costs associated with delivering the current State Planning and Research Work Program (SPR) and pooled fund research projects. The department may not expend any amounts on a long-range plan or corridor scenario analysis for I-5 from Tumwater to Marysville. (Motor Vehicle Account-Federal; Motor Vehicle Account-Local) (Ongoing)

WSDOT: Public Transportation – Program V

Uncommitted Grant Funding: -$441,000

Remaining uncommitted appropriations for the Regional Mobility Grant Program are removed. (Regional Mobility Grant Program Account-State) (One-Time)

Project Capital Spending Underruns: -$26.8 million

Funding is reduced to reflect historical agency underspend savings. (Regional Mobility Grant Program Account- State; Multimodal Transportation Account-State) (One-Time)

Transit Coordination Grant Delay: -$1 million

Amounts not yet under contract are moved from the 2019-21 biennium to the 2021-23 biennium. (Multimodal Transportation Account-State) (One-Time)

Appropriation authority for the public transportation program is reduced to reflect anticipated underruns, based on historical reappropriations levels. It is the intent for the legislature that no public transportation grants or projects be eliminated or substantially delayed as a result of revenue reductions.

Transportation Budget: WSDOT – Improvements – Program I

Project Capital Spending Underruns: -$323 million

Funding is reduced to reflect historical agency underspend savings. (Transportation Partnership Account-State; Connecting Washington Account-State; Special Category C Account-Bonds; other accounts) (One-Time)

Fish Passage Barrier

It is the intent of the legislature that the $726 million listed for the 2021-2023 biennium that accrued practical design savings deposited in the transportation future funding program account be used to help fund the cost of fully complying with the court injunction by 2030.

WSDOT is directed to pursue compliance with the US v Washington permanent injunction by delivering culvert corrections within the injunction area. WSDOT and the Brian Abbott fish barrier removal board, while providing the opportunity for stakeholders, tribes, and government agencies to give input on a statewide culvert remediation plan, must provide updated on the development of the statewide culvert remediation plan to the capital budget, ways and means, and transportation committees of the legislature by November 1,

2020.

Transportation Budget: WSDOT – Preservation – Program P

Capital Projects: $33 million

Funding is provided for capital projects that preserve the structural integrity of the state highway system, including preservation or rehabilitation of roadway pavements, safety features, bridges, and other structures. (Recreational Vehicle Account-State; Transportation Partnership Account-State; Motor Vehicle Account-State; other accounts) (One-Time)

Transportation Budget: WSDOT – Local Programs – Program Z

Capital Projects: -$26.2 million

Funding is reduced for various local priority projects and the Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety and Safe Routes to Schools grant programs. (Transportation Partnership Account-State; Motor Vehicle Account-State; Motor Vehicle Account-Federal; other accounts) (One-Time)

Projected Capital Spending Underruns: -$66.5 million

Funding is reduced to reflect historical agency underspend savings. (Connecting Washington Account-State; Multimodal Transportation Account-State) (One-Time)

Locally Canceled Projects: -$7.9 million

Funding is reduced for local priority projects that are not able to move forward due to local decisions and circumstances. (Motor Vehicle Account-State; Multimodal Transportation Account-State) (One-Time)

It is the intent of the legislature that no capital projects will be eliminated or substantially delayed as a result of revenue reductions, but that as a short-term solution appropriation authority is reduced to reflect anticipated underruns based on historical reappropriation levels.

2020 SUPPLEMENTAL CAPITAL BUDGET

CAPITAL BUDGET: Local & Community Projects

An additional $30 million is provided to the Department of Commerce for grants to local governments and nonprofit organizations for 138 community-based projects statewide.

Creative Districts (Statewide): $200k

Found in the Local & Community Projects list

Department of Commerce

2019-21 Housing Trust Fund Program: $5 million

  • Funding for competitive grant awards for the development of community housing and cottage communities to shelter individuals or households experiencing homelessness. Funding must be awarded to projects that develop a minimum of four individual structures in the same location.

2019-2021 Behavioral Health Capacity Grants:

  • $18.9 million is redirected to grants to community providers to increase behavioral health services for children and minor youth.
  • $7.3 million Funding is provided for an additional six enhanced service facilities for long-term placement of patients discharged or diverted from the state psychiatric hospitals and that are not subject to federal funding restrictions that apply to institutions of mental diseases.

Enhanced Shelter Capacity Grants: $7.8 million

Department of Ecology: $38.7 million

  • $33.7 million in additional funding from the Model Toxics Control Capital Account is provided for remedial action grants for cleanup projects by local governments.
  • $5 million in additional funding from the Model Toxics Control Stormwater Account is provided for competitively awarded grants to local governments to implement stormwater retrofit projects that treat polluted stormwater in priority areas throughout the state.

Department of Fish and Wildlife

  • Requires the Brian Abbot fish barrier removal board to develop a comprehensive statewide culvert remediation plan that works in conjunction with the state approach and that fully satisfies the requirements under the U.S. v Washington permanent injunction and makes both local and state funding recommendations for additional nonstate barrier corrections across state culvert corrections program.

Priority Bills That Passed

If there was a companion bill, the bill that passed is listed first.

HB 1590 - Allowing the local sales and use tax for affordable housing to be imposed by a councilmanic authority.

Prime Sponsor: Doglio

Status: Passed Legislature

Summary of Original Bill: Authorizes county or city legislative authorities to impose the local sales and use tax for housing and related services and eliminates the requirement that the imposition of the tax be subject to the approval of a majority of county or city voters at a general or special election.

Summary of Final Bill: Allows a county legislative authority to impose a sales and use tax for affordable housing by councilmanic action. Allows a city legislative authority in a county that has not imposed the full tax rate by September 30, 2020 to impose the remainder of the tax either by ballot proposition or by councilmanic action. Provides that a county with a population of over 1.5 million may only impose the full taxing authority under this bill if it plans to spend at least 30 percent of the revenue attributable to taxable activities or events within any city with a population greater than 60,000.

ESHB 1793 / SB 5789 Establishing additional uses for automated traffic safety cameras for traffic congestion reduction and increased safety.

Prime Sponsor: Fitzgibbon (House), Liias (Senate)

Status: Passed Legislature

Summary of Original Bill: Expands authorization for the use of automated traffic safety cameras for the following violations: Stopping When Traffic Obstructed; Stopping at Intersection or Crosswalk; public transportation only lane; and stopping, standing, and parking at locations restricted for emergency response vehicle entry or exit or the boarding or disembarking of public transportation vehicles,

including public ferries. Expands locations where automated traffic safety cameras are permitted to include midblock on arterial roadways.

Summary of Final Bill: Allows cities with a population over 500,000 to create a pilot program in a defined area within the city, expanding the use of automated traffic safety cameras to detect and issue infraction notices for violations related to: stopping at an intersection or crosswalk or when traffic is obstructed, using public transportation only lanes, and stopping or traveling in a restricted lane.

Requires 50 percent of the penalty monies be deposited into the new state Cooper Jones Active Transportation Safety Account and 50 percent to be spent by the city on transportation infrastructure mobility improvements for persons with disabilities. Limits the infraction fine to $75. Requires that a city report back to the Legislature on the program, including, but not limited to, the locations of the cameras, total warnings and infractions issued, and recommendations on use of automated cameras to detect the listed violations.

E2SHB 2311 / SB 6272 Amending state greenhouse gas emission limits for consistency with the most recent assessment of climate change science.

Prime Sponsor: Slatter (House), Das (Senate), By Request of Governor

Status: Passed Legislature

Summary of Original Bill: Modifies state greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets to 45 percent below 1990 levels by 2030, 70 percent below 1990 levels by 2040, and 95 percent below 1990 levels by 2050. Modifies state government greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets to 45 percent below 2005 levels by 2030, 70 percent below 2005 levels by 2040, and 95 percent below 2005 levels by 2050. Establishes a net zero greenhouse gas emissions target for 2050 for state government and for the state as a whole. Directs the Departments of Ecology and Commerce to include certain additional information in their biennial greenhouse gas emissions report to the Governor and the Legislature, including the quantity of greenhouse gas emissions from wildfires in the state and the quantity of greenhouse gas emissions from key sectors of the economy. Requires state agencies to report on their short-term and long-term strategies for meeting greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets.

Establishes that it is the policy of the state to promote the removal of excess carbon from the atmosphere through carbon sequestration activities.

Summary of Final Bill: Modifies state anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction limits and state agency GHG emissions reduction targets. Requires the state and state government as a whole to achieve net zero GHG emissions by 2050. Requires state agencies to report biannually on short-term and long-term strategies for meeting emissions reduction targets. Requires all state agencies to seek all practicable opportunities to costeffectively maximize carbon sequestration and carbon storage in their nonland management agency operations, contracting, and grant-making activities.

Budget Impact:

$240,000 GFS in funding is provided to the Department of Natural Resources in FY2021 and FY2022 to incorporate carbon sequestration into agency operations, contracting, and grant-making, as described in Engrossed Second Substitute House Bill 2311 (Greenhouse gas emissions). (General Fund-State) (Custom)

ESHB 2342 Aligning the timing of comprehensive plan updates required by the growth management act with the timing of shoreline master program updates required by the shoreline management act.

Prime Sponsor: Fitzgibbon

Status: Passed Legislature

Summary of Original Bill: Changes frequency of comprehensive plan updates under the Growth Management Act (GMA) from every eight years to every 10 years. Modifies the anniversary year by which certain counties and cities are required to update their comprehensive plans under the GMA. Requires counties and cities to update certain portions of their comprehensive plans at the five-year mark between full updates of their comprehensive plans. Changes frequency of shoreline master program updates within the Shoreline Management Act (SMA) from every eight years to every 10 years, beginning in 2022. Modifies the anniversary year by which certain cities and counties are required to update their shoreline master programs under the SMA.

Summary of Final Bill: Modifies the anniversary year by which certain counties and cities are required to update their comprehensive plans under the GMA. Modifies the anniversary year by which certain cities and counties are required to update their shoreline master programs under the SMA.

Budget Impact:

$ 100,000 in GFS is provided for implementation of Engrossed Substitute House Bill 2342 (comprehensive plan updates), including developing rules and guidance for local governments. (General Fund-State) (Ongoing)

SHB 2343 / SSB 6334 - Concerning urban housing supply.

Prime Sponsor: Fitzgibbon (House), Salomon (Senate)

Status: Passed Legislature

Summary of Original Bill: Modifies the list of planning actions that certain cities are encouraged to take in order to increase residential building capacity. Changes the date by which certain planning actions must be taken in order for those actions to be exempt from administrative or judicial appeal under the Growth Management Act and the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), from April 1, 2021, to April 1, 2023. Changes the frequency of transit service that triggers a cap on minimum residential parking requirements for certain affordable housing units, from four times per hour to two times per hour.

Exempts certain project actions from appeal under SEPA on the basis of impacts to the aesthetics element of the environment if they have undergone the design review process at the appropriate local government level. Modifies the definition of permanent supportive housing. Directs the Department of Ecology to initiate the rule-making process to remove parking as an element of the environment and as a component of the environmental checklist.

Summary of Final Bill: Modifies the list of planning actions that certain cities are encouraged to take in order to increase residential building capacity. Changes the date by which certain planning actions must be taken in order for those actions to be exempt from administrative or judicial appeal under the

Growth Management Act and the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), from April 1, 2021, to April 1, 2023. Changes the frequency of transit service that triggers a cap on minimum residential parking requirements for certain affordable housing units. Sets caps on minimum residential parking requirements for certain market rate multifamily housing units located near transit services. Modifies the definition of "permanent supportive housing." Directs the Department of Ecology to initiate the rulemaking process to remove parking as an element of the environment and as a component of the environmental checklist. Requires the Washington Center for Real Estate Research at the University of Washington to address certain specific housing topics within its existing obligation to produce ongoing reports on the Washington housing market.

HB 2497 - Adding development of permanently affordable housing to the allowable uses of community revitalization financing, the local infrastructure financing tool, and local revitalization financing.

Prime Sponsor: Ormsby

Status: Passed Legislature

Summary of Original Bill: The purchasing, rehabilitating, retrofitting for energy efficiency, and constructing housing for the purpose of creating or preserving permanently affordable housing is added to the public improvement costs authorized for CRF, LIFT, and LRF.

Permanently affordable housing is defined as housing, regardless of ownership, for which there is a legally binding, recorded document in effect that limits the price at which the owner may sell. The type of documents could include affordability covenants, deed restrictions and community land trust leases. Resale restriction could include continuous ownership of land by a public entity or nonprofit housing provider with a lease allowing ownership of the structure by an income-eligible household; or a nonpossessory interest or right, such a deed restriction, in real property that ensures affordability.

Summary of Final Bill: The purchase, rehabilitation, energy efficiency retrofit, and construction of housing for creating or preserving permanently affordable housing is added to the public improvement costs authorized for the CRF Act, the LIFT, and the LRF programs. "Permanently affordable housing" is defined as housing, regardless of ownership, for which there is a legally binding, recorded document in effect limiting the price at which the owner may sell or restricts the occupancy of the unit to a qualified, low-income household for 40 years for a property used as a shelter or rental housing, or for 25 years for a property to be owned by a low-income household.

HB 2508 / SB 6481 - Simplifying the process for donating low-value surplus property owned by a city-owned utility.

Prime Sponsor: Wylie (House), Cleveland (Senate)

Status: Passed Legislature

Summary of Original Bill: Personal property or equipment with an estimated value of $50,000 or less that was originally acquired for public utility purposes and is surplus to the city's needs and not required for providing continued public utility service may be disposed of without a resolution or public hearing.

Summary of Final Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

HB 2587 – Establishing a program for the designation of state scenic bikeways.

Prime Sponsor: Ramel

Status: Passed Legislature

Summary of Original Bill: Requires the Parks and Recreation Commission to establish a scenic bikeways program for the designation and promotion of bicycle routes of notable scenic, recreational, cultural, or historic value.

Summary of Final Bill: An amendment in Agriculture, Water, Natural Rsources and Parks has the effect of requiring that, prior to designating a scenic bikeway, the commission consult with a local government legislative authority if the scenic bikeway will be located within the local government's jurisdiction.

Budget Impact:

$120,000 GFS in ongoing funding is provided to the State Parks and Recreation Commission to manage a scenic bikeways program, as described in House Bill 2587 (Scenic bikeways). (General Fund-State) (Ongoing)

SHB 2634 / SB 6366 - Exempting a sale or transfer of real property for affordable housing to a nonprofit entity, housing authority, or public corporation from the real estate excise tax.

Prime Sponsor: Mullet (Senate), Walen (House)

Status: Passed Legislature

Summary of Original Bill: Property sold to a qualifying grantee used for rental housing for low income households is exempt from REET. A qualifying grantee includes nonprofit housing providers, housing authority, or public corporation intending to use the property for rental housing. If a qualifying grantee intends to receive or operate existing housing on the property as affordable housing, they must certify by affidavit their intent to qualify the property within one year. If a qualifying grantee intends to develop new affordable housing on the site, they must certify by affidavit their intent to qualify the property within five years. If a qualifying grantee intends to substantially rehabilitate the premises, they certify by affidavit their intent to qualify the property within three years.

If a qualifying grantee fails to receive, or otherwise qualify the property for an exemption within the prescribed timeline, REET must be paid, plus interest. If the property is transferred to another qualifying grantee, REET is not due if the property is operated or developed for the intended purpose within the exemption period of the initial transfer. There is no limit on the number of transfers between qualifying grantees.

Summary of Final Bill: The substitute bill: requires a qualifying grantee to provide proof to the DOR upon exemption qualification, rather than requiring them to file a second affidavit; clarifies that if unpaid REET and interest become due, that the date of interest will be calculated from the date of the initial transfer; provides that if the property is transferred to a new qualifying grantee who fails to qualify the property for the

exemptions, only the new qualifying grantee is liable for the payment of taxes; removes reference to an undefined term of "affordable housing"; and removes an irrelevant chapter reference.

EHB 2797 / SSB 6631 - Concerning the sales and use tax for affordable and supportive housing.

Prime Sponsor: Robinson (House), Saldaña (Senate)

Status: House Speaker Signed

Summary of Original Bill: Modifies certain provisions of, and extends various deadlines related to, the local sales tax for affordable or supportive housing.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: The deadline for adopting a qualifying local tax is extended from July 28, 2020, to December 31, 2021. A city that intends to adopt a qualifying local tax by the due date must adopt a resolution of intent to impose the tax by July 28, 2020. A county or city must send a copy of legislation authorizing the tax to the Department of Revenue (DOR) within 45 days of adoption. DOR must calculate preliminary cap amounts by January 1, 2021. The annual maximum cap for a county equals the taxable retail sales within the unincorporated area of a county, within nonparticipating cities, and within cities without a qualifying local tax. Final cap amounts must be calculated by June 30, 2022. Cities and counties are authorized to use revenues on staffing for operations of permanent supportive housing. Certain small counties and cities are authorized to use up to 6 percent of the revenues for administrative costs. Housing and services may only be provided to persons at or below 60 percent of median household income of the standard metropolitan area within the county or town imposing the tax. A county may not pledge for repayment of bonds any revenues from the tax collected within cities levying the tax: (1) before July 28, 2020; or (2) before June 30, 2022, within cities that have adopted a notice of intent to authorize a qualifying local tax. Cities and counties are authorized to enter into contracts or interlocal agreements with public entities or nonprofit organizations.

SHB 2950 - Addressing affordable housing needs through the multifamily housing tax exemption by providing an extension of the exemption until January 1, 2022, for certain properties currently receiving a twelve-year exemption and by convening a work group

Prime Sponsor: Macri

Status: Senate Passed 3rd

Summary of Original Bill: Extends the property tax exemption, until January 1, 2022, for properties currently receiving a 12-year exemption under the multifamily property tax exemption (MFTE) that is set to expire after the effective date of the bill, but before January 1, 2022. Directs the Department of Commence to convene a workgroup to study and make recommendations on certain aspects of the MFTE program.

Latest Version of Bill: Extends the property tax exemption, until December 31, 2021, for properties currently receiving a 12-year exemption under the multifamily property tax exemption (MFTE) that is set to expire after the effective date of the bill, but before December 31, 2021. Directs the Department of Commence to contract with a nonprofit organization to convene a work group to study and make recommendations on certain aspects of the MFTE program.

HB 2965 - Concerning the state's response to the novel coronavirus.

Prime Sponsor: Cody

Status: Passed Legislature

Summary of Original Bill: Appropriates $50 million from the Budget Stabilization Account, via the Disaster Response Account, to be allotted to state agencies and distributed to local governments for response to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Authorizes the Department of Social and Health Services to determine nursing facility payments to adequately resource facilities responding to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Summary of Final Bill: Increases the Budget Stabilization Account transfer to the Disaster Response Account from $100 million to $175 million. Increases the OFM appropriation from the Disaster Response Account from $100 million to $175 million. Provides $25 million in General Fund—Federal funding. In addition to the existing accountability pieces in section 2, adds that OFM will create unique appropriation and expenditure codes in the statewide accounting system for COVID-19 spending that state agencies and higher education institutions must use to track spending from the Disaster Response Account and for other unanticipated spending using funding from the operating budget. Cleans up the nonsupplant and federal reimbursement language to add tribes. Appropriates $25 million of the Budget Stabilization Account into the newly created COVID-19 unemployment account, a nonappropriated fund. Requires the Employment Security Department to use federal funds for the same purpose first and to reimburse the Budget Stabilization Account if necessary. Any unobligated funds on July 1, 2021, would be transferred back to the Budget Stabilization Account. Allows employers who have employees receiving unemployment insurance benefits as a direct or indirect result of the COVID-19 outbreak to apply by September 30, 2020, for the COVID-19 unemployment account to cover the unemployment benefit charges of the employer. If the $25 million is not enough to provide 100 percent relief, the amount of relief will be reduced proportionally amongst all approved employers.

Limits the determination of nursing facility payments to the current coronavirus declared emergency and expires this language June 30, 2021. Provides that until June 30, 2021, an individual under quarantine or isolation during the novel coronavirus outbreak will meet the requirements to be eligible to receive unemployment insurance benefits if the individual is able to perform, available to perform, and actively seeking work which can be performed while under quarantine or isolation.

Allows the State Board of Education to establish an emergency waiver program to grant local education agencies flexibility from graduation requirements due to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), and to adopt rules to waive provisions for private schools due to the novel coronavirus. Sets an expiration date for the emergency waiver program of July 31, 2020.

Budget Impact:

Engrossed House Bill 2965 appropriates $175 million from the Disaster Response Account and $25 million from General Fund-Fedearl to the Office of Financial Management for distribution to state agencies, federally recognized tribes, and local governments for coronavirus (COVID-19) response efforts. (General Fund-Federal; Disaster Response Account-State) Provides $25 million in General Fund—Federal funding. Appropriates $25 million of the Budget Stabilization Account into the newly created COVID-19 unemployment account (One-Time)

SB 6212/HB 2489 - Concerning the authority of counties, cities, and towns to exceed statutory property tax limitations for the purpose of financing affordable housing for very low-income households and low-income households.

Prime Sponsor: Ryu (House), Das (Senate)

Status: Passed Legislature

Summary of Original Bill: Funds from the affordable housing property tax levy may be used for affordable homeownership, owner-occupied home repair, and foreclosure prevention programs for low-income households. Low-income households are defined as a single person, family, or unrelated persons living together whose income is at or below 80 percent of the median income, with adjustments for household size, for the county where the taxing district is located.

Summary of Final Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

2SSB 6231/HB 2630 Expanding and studying the property tax exemption for physical improvements to single-family dwelling.

Prime Sponsor: Kuderer (Senate), Walen (House)

Status: Passed Legislature

Summary of Original Bill: Exempts the value of constructing an accessory dwelling unit from property taxes for three years.

Summary of Final Bill: Exempts the value of constructing an accessory dwelling unit from property taxes for three years. Requires the Department of Revenue to evaluate the home improvement property tax exemption and provide a report to the appropriate legislative committees by November 15, 2020.

ESSB 6617 – Concerning accessory dwelling unit regulation.

Prime Sponsor: Liias

Status: Passed Legislature

Summary of Original Bill: Requires counties planning under the Growth Management Act and cities within such counties to authorize up to two accessory dwelling units (ADUs) per lot, to not require the provision of off-street parking for ADUs close to major transit stops, and to not require an owner to occupy an ADU or other housing unit on the lot unless the owner owns more than five ADUs.

Summary of Final Bill: By July 1, 2021, any city within a county planning under the GMA must adopt or amend ordinances, regulations, or other official controls that do not require the provision of off-street parking for ADUs within 0.25 mile of a major transit stop. However, such a city may require the provision of off-street parking for an ADU located within 0.25 mile of a major transit stop if the city determines the ADU is in an area with a lack of access to street parking capacity, physical space impediments, or other reasons to support that on-street parking is infeasible for the ADU. In addition,

such a city that has adopted or substantively amended its ADU regulations within the previous four years is exempt from the new ADU requirements regarding off-street parking. Major transit stop is defined as: a stop on certain high capacity transportation systems; commuter rail stops; stops on rail or fixed guideway systems, including transitways; stops on bus rapid transit routes or routes that run on high occupancy vehicle lanes; or stops for a bus or other transit mode providing fixed route service at intervals of at least 15 minutes during the peak hours of operation.

Beginning July 1, 2021, the new ADU requirements apply and take effect in any GMA city that has not adopted or amended such regulations and supersede, preempt, and invalidate any conflicting local development regulations.

Governing documents of condominium, homeowner, and common interest ownership associations are not modified or limited by the provisions of the bill.

Priority Bills That Did Not Pass

If there was a companion bill, the one that made it furthest in the process is listed first and the summary of the latest version is based on the one that made it the furthest in the process.

E2SHB 1110 – Reducing the greenhouse gas emissions associated with transportation fuels.

Prime Sponsor: Fitzgibbon

Status: Senate Transportation

Summary of Original Bill: Directs the Department of Ecology (ECY) to adopt a rule establishing a Clean Fuels Program to limit the greenhouse gas emissions per unit of transportation fuel energy to 10 percent below 2017 levels by 2028 and 20 percent below 2017 levels by 2035. Excludes exported fuel, fuel used by vessels, railroad locomotives, and aircraft, and certain other categories of fuel from the Clean Fuels Program requirements. Requires the Clean Fuels Program to include processes for the tracking of compliance obligations and bankable, tradeable credits. Requires annual reporting by the ECY on the Clean Fuels Program, as well as an analysis of the program's first five years by the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Committee. Retains the current distribution of revenue under the 2015 Transportation Revenue Package, eliminating changes that would have been triggered as a result of the establishment of a Clean Fuels Program.

Summary of Final Bill: Directs the Department of Ecology (Ecology) to adopt a rule establishing a Clean Fuels Program (Program) to limit greenhouse gas emissions per unit of transportation fuel energy to 10 percent below 2017 levels by 2028 and 20 percent below 2017 levels by 2035. Excludes exported fuel, electricity, fuel used by vessels, railroad locomotives, and aircraft, and certain other categories of transportation fuel from the Program's requirements. Requires the Program to include processes for tracking compliance obligations and bankable, tradeable credits. Requires annual reporting by Ecology on the Program, as well as an analysis of the Program's first five years by the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Committee. Retains the current revenue distribution under the 2015 Transportation revenue package, eliminating changes that would have been triggered as a result of the establishment of a Program.

HB 2282 - Creating a grant program for converting unused public buildings to housing for homeless persons.

Prime Sponsor: Walsh

Status: House Capital Budget

Summary of Original Bill: The Public Building Conversion Grant Program (Program) is created in the Department of Commerce (Department) to encourage counties to rehabilitate, retrofit, or convert unused, publicly owned buildings into housing for homeless persons. The Department is responsible for developing, managing, and overseeing the application process. In order to be apply for the grants, counties must: have a population of 100,000 or less; and submit an inventory of unused public buildings to the Department by April 1, 2020 and update the inventory on a quarterly basis.

Except for when providing temporary, severe weather housing, counties are required to prohibit the illegal possession of controlled substances on the premises or grounds of any building converted to housing for homeless persons with the grant awards. The Department is responsible for protecting the state's interest upon the sale or change of use of projects financed through the Program or upon a county's failure to comply with the grant requirements. The Program expires December 31, 2021.

Summary Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

SHB 2388 / SSB 6472 - Standardizing definitions of homelessness to improve access to services.

Prime Sponsor: Senn (House), Lovelett (Senate)

Status: Senate Ways & Means

Summary of Original Bill: The definition of homelessness for purposes of prioritizing HEN funds includes a person lacking a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, including circumstances such as sharing housing of other persons. A definition of "homeless" is added for purposes of the ECEAP and the WCCC program in accordance with McKinney-Vento. The definition of "homeless person" for purposes of the TANF program applies to cases where a family includes a homeless child or youth as defined by McKinney-Vento. For the purposes of child welfare, dependency proceedings, the child welfare housing assistance pilot, and for individuals who qualify for a reduced identicard fee, "experiencing homelessness" is defined as a person living outside or in a building not meant for human habitation or which they have no legal right to occupy, in an emergency shelter, a temporary housing program, or who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, including circumstances such as sharing the housing of other persons.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: Early Childhood Education and Assistance and Working Connections Child Care Programs. Under these programs, homeless means without a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence as described in the federal McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, Subchapter VI, Part B: Education for Homeless Children and Youths (McKinney-Vento).

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families. Under TANF, a recipient is exempt from the 60month time limit by reason of hardship if the family includes a homeless child or youth without a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence as described in McKinney-Vento.

Child Welfare. For the purposes of child welfare, dependency proceedings, the child welfare housing assistance pilot program and for individuals who qualify for a reduced identicard fee, "experiencing homelessness" means an individual who is: living outside or in a building not meant for human habitation or which they have no legal right to occupy, in an emergency shelter, or a temporary housing program that may include a transitional housing program if habitation time limits exist; or lacking a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, including circumstances such as sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, fleeing domestic violence, or a similar reason.

HB 2413 - Concerning funding for wildfire prevention and preparedness activities.

Prime Sponsor: Fitzgibbon, By Request of Dept. of Natural Resources

Status: House Appropriations

Summary of Original Bill: Creates the wildfire prevention and preparedness account in the state treasury and directs specific priorities for spending on fire prevention & forest health, and for investment in and maintenance of tracking and reporting systems to ensure accountability & transparency in wildfire prevention activities & costs. Funding is appropriated for fire preparedness activities; fire prevention activities; activities to restore and improve forest health and reduce vulnerability to drought, insect infestation, disease and other threats to healthy forests; and investment in and maintenance of tracking and reporting systems to ensure accountability and transparency in wildfire prevention and preparedness activities and costs.

Summary Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

ESHB 2427 – Tackling climate change as a goal of the growth management act.

Prime Sponsor: Duerr

Status: Senate Local Government

Summary of Original Bill: Adds climate change to the planning goals that guide the development and adoption of city and county comprehensive plans and development regulations under the Growth Management Act (GMA). Requires the consideration of the climate change planning goal by regional transportation planning organizations and in countywide planning policies under the GMA.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: Adds, for specified counties and cities, climate change to the planning goals that guide the development and adoption of city and county comprehensive plans and development regulations under the Growth Management Act (GMA). Requires the consideration of the climate change planning goal by regional transportation planning organizations and in countywide planning policies under the GMA.

HB 2503 – Addressing the removal of fish passage barriers.

Prime Sponsor: Barkis

Status: House Transportation

Summary of Original Bill: Adds tribal governments to the entities that the state Fish Passage Barrier Removal Board (Board) must coordinate with, to the extent the tribal governments are willing to participate and choose to share certain information. Requires the Board to prepare a prioritized list of fish passage barrier removal projects every even-numbered year until 2031, and allows the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) to only undertake fish passage barrier removal projects on the list, necessary for completion of another WSDOT project, or as directed in statute or an appropriations act.

Creates the Fish Passage Barrier Removal Account, which is allowed to keep its interest, and limits expenditures from the account to fish passage barrier removal projects on the WSDOT's land or on the Board's list.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

HB 2461 / SB 6452- Including health in the state transportation system policy goals.

Prime Sponsor: Riccelli (House), Billig (Senate)

Status: Senate Transportation

Summary of Original Bill: Expands the existing goals, objectives, and responsibilities related to the operation of a statewide transportation system to include the health of people living in Washington. Adds a goal to improve the health of Washington's residents, by considering health implications and encouraging active transportation when designing, building, and maintaining Washington's transportation system.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: A seventh statewide transportation system policy goal is added as follows: health: to improve the health of Washington's residents, by considering health implications and encouraging active transportation when designing, building, and maintaining Washington's transportation system. House amendment made a change to declares that there is a connection between transportation systems and individual's health rather than that the connection between transportation and health is indisputable.

HB 2550 Establishing net ecological gain as a policy for application across identified land use, development, and environmental laws.

Prime Sponsor: Lekanoff

Status: House Appropriations

Summary of Original Bill: Directs the Office of Financial Management to submit a report to the Legislature by December 1, 2020, that assesses how to incorporate a standard of net ecological gain, and an associated mitigation hierarchy, into the Growth Management Act (GMA), Shoreline Management Act (SMA), Construction Projects in State Waters/Hydraulic Projects Approvals (HPAs), and Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) wherever the existing standard in those laws is less protective of ecological integrity than the standard of net ecological gain. Declares that it is the policy of the state for the GMA, SMA, HPAs, and MTCA to achieve net ecological gain, and requires the adoption of state agency rules consistent with a standard of net ecological gain under each of those laws where existing statutory authority does not otherwise bind the agencies to a different standard of ecological protectiveness. Limits requirements for

state agencies to allow watershed-based compensatory aquatic resources mitigation to apply only to certain infrastructure development projects, rather than both infrastructure projects and non- infrastructure projects.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: Directs the Office of Financial Management to submit a report to the Legislature by December 1, 2020, that assesses how to incorporate a standard of net ecological gain into the Growth Management Act, Shoreline Management Act, Construction Projects in State Waters/Hydraulic Projects Approvals, and Model Toxics Control Act, or other laws and rules where the existing standard is less protective of ecological integrity than the standard of net ecological gain.

2SHB 2570 – Managing growth by planning and zoning for accessory dwelling units.

Prime Sponsor: Gregerson

Status: House Rules C

Summary of Original Bill: Requires some cities and counties (covered jurisdictions) planning under the Growth Management Act (GMA) to adopt six specified policies related to accessory dwelling units (ADUs) by July 1, 2021. Requires covered jurisdictions to adopt three of five additional specified policies related to ADUs by July 1, 2021. Encourages covered jurisdictions to adopt 11 optional specified policies related to ADUs. Provides that the adoption of the ADU policies that covered jurisdictions are required or encouraged to implement are exempt from appeals under the GMA and the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA). Repeals requirements applicable to certain counties and cities that direct the adoption of ADU policies consistent with a 1993 report to the Legislature from the predecessor agency to the Department of Commerce.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: Requires some cities and counties (covered jurisdictions) planning under the Growth Management Act (GMA) to adopt four specified policies related to accessory dwelling units (ADUs) by July 1, 2021. Encourages covered jurisdictions to adopt 17 optional specified policies related to ADUs. Provides that the adoption of the required or encouraged ADU policies by covered jurisdictions are exempt from appeals under the GMA. Provides that the adoption of the required or encouraged ADU policies by all cities and all counties taking action within designated urban growth areas are exempt from appeals under the State Environmental Policy Act. Requires the Department of Commerce to update a model ADU policy created in a predecessor agency's 1994 report to the Legislature that guides the ADU policies of certain cities and counties by December 15, 2021.

HB 2609 / SB 6335 – Addressing climate change through growth management.

Prime Sponsor: Duerr (House), Salomon (Senate)

Status: House Environment & Energy

Summary of Original Bill: Adds climate change mitigation and adaptation as a goal of the Growth Management Act (GMA). Requires the consideration of the climate change planning goal by regional transportation planning organizations and in countywide planning policies under the GMA, in addition to consideration of the goal in city and county GMA comprehensive plans. Requires certain larger counties

and the cities within those counties to develop a climate change and natural hazards resiliency element (resiliency element) of GMA comprehensive plans, beginning as early as 2023. Requires the Department of Commerce (COM) to develop a model resiliency element that multi-county regions, counties, and cities may adopt, and the adoption of which exempts the jurisdiction's resiliency element from appeals under the GMA or the State Environmental Policy Act until 2029. Directs the COM to develop calculations of the proportionate share of state emissions attributable to transportation and land-use activities within multi- county regions, counties, and cities and requires the resiliency element of local government comprehensive plans be designed to achieve their assigned share of emissions reductions.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

SHB 2620 / 2SSB 6411 - Expanding the property tax exemption for new and rehabilitated multiple-unit dwellings in urban growth areas.

Prime Sponsor: Walen (House), Das (Senate), By Request of Governor

Status: H Rule C

Summary of Original Bill: Authorizes all cities, and all counties that are planning under the Growth Management Act, to provide the Multifamily Property Tax Exemption (MFTE). Authorizes 12-year extensions of properties currently exempt under the MFTE. Establishes minimum density requirements for residential targeted areas.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: The substitute bill modifies the income thresholds to be relative to the city or county median income; makes technical corrections to language related to zoning requirements; requires affordable units be provided in different sizes substantially proportional to the property as a whole; makes technical corrections to the treatment of exempt value at the end of the exemption period; requires applicants receiving the exemption to notify tenants of rent-restricted units with notice of intent to apply for an additional exemption period or to increase rents at the end of the exemption; increases the minimum required scheduled bus service intervals to every 20 minutes for RTAs designated by counties in certain cases; requires the local governing authority to adopt income and rent standards for affordable units to be used in considering applications for the exemption; clarifies local governing authorities' ability to adopt and implement more stringent affordability requirements for any exemption granted under the program; requires a city or county to conduct a review of a projects benefit to the public (instead of the projects profitability) and provides guidelines for such review; requires applicants who receive a new exemption after July 1, 2020 to provide to tenants of rent-restricted units: (1) at the end of the exemption, gradual monthly rent increase over a period of months equivalent to the number of years that a tenant occupied the unit; (2) rental assistance for up to one year; or (3) at the end of the exemption, relocation assistance; requires local governing authorities to conduct a cumulative assessment of all exemptions provided under the program. The assessment must be conducted by June 1, 2024, and every four years thereafter; clarifies annual reporting requirements; and requires the Commerce to consult with stakeholders to review and consider revising the reporting requirements of the bill by December 1, 2020.

SHB 2649 - Concerning homeless shelter capacity.

Prime Sponsor: Ryu

Status: H 2nd Reading

Summary of Original Bill: Requires certain counties and cities to amend local homeless housing plans by December 1, 2020, to expand shelter or sanctioned camping capacity to serve at least 50 percent of the homeless people living within the jurisdiction. Redirects certain funds from the Homeless Housing and Assistance Surcharge due to a county or city without an amended local plan to the Department of Commerce (Department). Requires the Department to contract with an eligible entity or entities to execute a homeless sheltering plan in a county or city without an amended local plan.

Summary of Final Bill: Requires certain counties and cities to develop a list of parcels that are zoned, suitable, and potentially feasible for development of shelters, sanctioned camping, affordable housing for persons with disabilities, permanent supportive housing, and behavioral health facilities. Directs the Department of Commerce, in coordination with counties, cities, and local homeless housing task forces, to develop plans for addressing any unmet housing and sheltering needs.

The original bill required certain counties and cities to amend local homeless housing plans to expand shelter or sanctioned camping capacity to serve at least 50 percent of the homeless people living within the jurisdiction. The plans were required to include changes that would be implemented at the local level and changes needed at the state level.

The substitute bill requires certain counties and cities to develop a list of parcels that are zoned, suitable, and potentially feasible for development of shelters, sanctioned camping, affordable housing for persons with disabilities, permanent supportive housing, and behavioral health facilities. The substitute bill also directs the Department, in coordination with counties, cities, and local homeless housing task forces, to develop plans for addressing any unmet housing and sheltering needs.

The original bill redirected certain funds from the Homeless Housing and Assistance Surcharge (surcharge) due to a county or city without an amended local homeless housing plan to the Department. The Department would use the funds to contract with another entity or entities to execute a homeless sheltering plan in the county or city without an amended plan. The substitute bill does not make any changes to how the surcharge is distributed.

HB 2688 /SB 6398 - Expanding transportation policy goals. Prime Sponsor: Shewmake (House), Saldaña (Senate) Status: House Transportation, Senate Transportation

Summary of Original Bill: Modifies and expands Washington's transportation policy goals. Requires all transportation projects, prior to inclusion in a budget authorization, to be evaluated by a variety of state agencies relative to the state's transportation policy goals and various metrics created under the bill. Requires all reductions to transportation projects, prior to inclusion in a budget authorization, to be evaluated by a variety of state agencies relative to the state's transportation policy goals and various metrics created under the bill. States that budget authorization should not include projects that do not score above a threshold determined by the Washington State Department of Transportation, and that

all projects being evaluated should be included in a regional transportation planning organization's existing regional plan.

Summary Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

HB 2746 - Concerning affordable housing incentives Prime Sponsor: Ramel

Status:  House Finance

Summary of Original Bill: Increases the minimum affordability requirements of the Multifamily Property Tax Exemption. Requires the Department of Commerce to prepare a report on city and county compliance with the reporting requirements of the exemption. Creates a Multifamily Property Tax Exemption work group.

Summary Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

HB 2774 - Concerning the inventory of underutilized, state-owned property that may be suitable for the development of affordable housing.

Prime Sponsor: Ryu

Status: House Housing & Community Development

Summary of Original Bill: Requires the Department of Commerce (Commerce) to combine the inventories of state-owned real properties available for lease or sale that are submitted to Commerce by certain state agencies. Requires Commerce to annually publish the inventory of state-owned real properties on its website and provide notice of its publication to parties interested in developing the sites for affordable housing.

Summary Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

ESHB 2849 - Concerning housing programs administered by the department of commerce.

Prime Sponsor: Tharinger

Status: Senate Ways & Means

Summary of Original Bill: Combines the Housing Assistance Program and the Affordable Housing Program into the Housing Trust Fund Program. Requires loan deferrals for Housing Trust Fund projects with at least 50 percent of the units serving extremely low-income households or with at least 50 percent of the units dedicated to permanent supportive housing and 25 percent are for extremely low- income households. Requires the Department of Commerce to issue annual net cash flow loans for all other Housing Trust Fund loans. Changes the funding sources for administrative costs associated with the Housing Trust Fund Program.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: Combines the Housing Assistance Program and the Affordable Housing Program into the Housing Trust Fund Program. Requires loan deferrals for Housing Trust Fund projects with at least half of the units serving households with incomes under 50 percent. Requires the Department of Commerce to issue cash flow loans for all other Housing Trust Fund loans. Changes the funding sources for administrative costs associated with the Housing Trust. Effects of an amendment in the Senate Housing Affordability and Stability Committee: Adds technical assistance and portfolio preservation activities to the allowable expenditures from the new Housing Portfolio Monitoring account. Changes the cap for administrative expenditures associated with compliance and monitoring from 0.25 percent to 0.35 percent of the housing trust fund (HTF) portfolio. Clarifies that the additional 1 percent is for HTF application, distribution, and project development activities.

HB 2913 Transportation Revenue Prime Sponsor: Fey

Status: H Transportation

Summary of Original Bill: Increases the motor vehicle fuel taxes by 0.7 cent on July 1, 2020 and by 1 cent each year for the next nine years. Creates the Fish Passage Barrier Removal Account in the State Treasury. Requires revenues generated by the fuel tax increase in the bill be deposited in the Fish Passage Barrier Removal Account.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

HB 2948 / SB 6692 - Granting additional and progressive tax authority for counties with populations exceeding two million and cities therein to impose an excise tax on businesses that addresses the affordable housing crisis and reduces homelessness through evidence-based practices that will save lives and improve public safety, while also ensuring certainty and predictability for businesses.

Prime Sponsor: Springer (House), Keiser (Senate)

Status: House Finance

Summary of Original Bill: Authorizes a county with a population of at least 2 million persons to impose an annual tax on payroll expenses.

Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

SB 6126 - Allowing the local sales and use tax for affordable housing to be imposed by a councilmanic authority.

Prime Sponsor: Hunt

Status: Senate Rules X File

Summary of Original Bill: Allows the local sales and use tax for affordable housing to be imposed by councilmanic authority rather than by a majority of voters. Removes provisions mandating different treatment of cities in counties with a population of more than 1.5 million.

Summary of Final Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

SB 6167 / HB 2522 Making expenditures from the budget stabilization account to alleviate the issue of homelessness.

Prime Sponsor: Rolfes (Senate), Ormsby (House), By Request of Office of Financial Management

Status: Senate Ways & Means

Summary of Original Bill: The Legislature finds the state experiences a high rate of homelessness. Moneys from the Budget Stabilization Account are appropriated into the following accounts to address the immediate crisis of unsheltered homelessness: $280.7 million is appropriated for the 2019-2021 biennium expenditure into the Home Security Fund for homeless response programs in the 2019-21 and 2021-2023 fiscal biennia; $30 million is appropriated for the 2019-2021 biennium expenditure into the Washington Housing Trust Fund for additional homeless shelters and enhancements to existing shelters in the 2019-21 and 2021-2023 fiscal biennia; and $8 million is appropriated for the 2019-2021 biennium expenditure into the Model Toxics Control Operating Account for funding to remove solid, hazardous and infectious waste generated by vacant homeless encampments in the 2019-21 and 2021- 2023 fiscal biennia.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

SSB 6364 Incentivizing smaller, more affordable single-family home development through impact fee schedule modifications.

Prime Sponsor: Zeiger

Status: Senate Rules X

Summary of Original Bill: Authorizes local governments to implement a tiered fee structure in their impact fee schedules for single-family homes based on square footage per bedroom of the housing unit.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: Authorizes local governments to implement a tiered fee structure in their impact fee schedules for single-family homes based on square footage of the housing unit.

SSB 6385 - Providing for jobs training for homeless individuals.

Prime Sponsor: Zeiger

Status: Senate Rules X File

Summary of Original Bill: Directs the Department of Commerce to establish a competitive program for awarding grants to municipalities using a labor program model designed for providing jobs to individuals experiencing homelessness to lead to full-time employment and stable housing.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: Subject to appropriation, Commerce must establish a competitive program for awarding grants to municipalities using a labor program model designed for providing jobs to individuals experiencing homelessness to lead to full time employment and stable housing.

SB 6386 - Reducing impact fees for low-income housing.

Prime Sponsor: Zeiger

Status: S Rules X File

Summary of Original Bill: Directs the Department of Commerce to establish a competitive program for awarding grants to municipalities using a labor program model designed for providing jobs to individuals experiencing homelessness to lead to full-time employment and stable housing.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: Directs the Department of Commerce to establish a competitive program for awarding grants to municipalities using a labor program model designed for providing jobs to individuals experiencing homelessness to lead to full-time employment and stable housing. Changes in the Ways & Means Committee make the competitive homeless job grant program subject to appropriation. A floor amendment allows municipalities to use grant funds to assist in the collection of documentation and the procurement of an identicard for individuals experiencing homelessness.

SB 6398 / HB 2688 - Expanding transportation policy goals. Prime Sponsor: Saldaña (Senate), Shewmake (House) Status: Senate Transportation

Summary of Original Bill: Modifies Washington's transportation policy goals. Requires all new transportation projects or reductions of transportation projects, prior to inclusion in a budget authorization, to be evaluated by a variety of state agencies relative to the state's transportation policy goals and various metrics. States that budget authorizations should not include projects that do not score above a threshold determined by the Washington State Department of Transportation, and that the projects being evaluated should be included in a regional transportation planning organization existing regional plan.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

SSB 6536 / HB 2780 - Creating more housing options in traditionally single-family zones.

Prime Sponsor: Das (Senate), Macri (House)

Status: S Rules X File

Summary of Original Bill: Requires counties planning under the Growth Management Act (GMA) and cities with a population of 15,000 or more within such counties to provide for the development of duplexes, triplexes, quadplexes, townhouses, and courtyard apartments in areas zoned for detached singlefamily residences. Requires cities with a population of fewer than 15,000 within counties planning under the GMA to provide for the development of duplexes, with the authority to provide higher- density housing options, in lots or parcels zoned for detached single-family residences. Clarifies that single-family residences may still be permitted under new zoning requirements.

Summary of Final Bill: Changes made in the first substitute have the following effects: Requires counties planning under the GMA and cities over 15,000 within such counties to provide by ordinance regulations that authorize the development of duplexes, triplexes, sixplexes, stacked flats, townhomes, and courtyard apartments in areas zoned for detached single-family residential use and within 0.5 miles of a major transit stop. Removes requirement for such counties and cities to provide by ordinance regulations that authorized the development of a triplex on each lot or parcel zoned for detached single-family residences. Requires counties planning under the GMA and cities over 10,000 within such counties to provide by ordinance regulations that authorize the development of duplexes in areas zoned for detached single-family residential use. Removes requirement that cities with a population of fewer than 15,000 within GMA planning counites to provide by ordinance regulations that authorize the development of a duplex on each lot or parcel zoned for detached single-family residential use, and the authority of such cities to provide for certain higher density housing options. Clarifies that the new zoning requirements apply within the urban growth areas of cities and counties.

SSB 6606 Concerning regional transit authorities Prime Sponsor: Liias

Status: S Rules X File

Summary of Original Bill: Requires a regional transit authority (RTA) that levies a motor vehicle excise tax (MVET) to use a new depreciation schedules to determine the value of vehicles. Amends the new depreciation schedule for passenger vehicles and light trucks to reduce the value of vehicles with between 12 and 15 years of service for the purpose of calculating a MVET. Adds new requirements for lease agreements between the Washington State Department of Transportation, RTAs, and other public entities. Allows vehicle owners subject to a MVET levied by a RTA to pay the tax using a Good to Go! account and to enter into a quarterly or monthly payment plan. Repeals the parts of Initiative 976 related to RTA MVETs if the initiative is allowed to take effect.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

SSB 6649 - Establishing a local sales and use tax option to fund emergency homeless shelters.

Prime Sponsor: Zeiger

Status: Senate Ways & Means

Summary of Original Bill: x Authorizes a city or county to impose a 0.03 percent local sales and use tax, credited against the state portion of the sales tax, for operating and capital costs for emergency housing shelters for the homeless.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

SB 6696 - Making expenditures from the budget stabilization account for declared catastrophic events.

Prime Sponsor: O’Ban

Status: Ways & Means

Summary of Original Bill: Appropriates the sum of one hundred million dollars from the budget stabilization account to the disaster response account. This amount is provided solely for response and recovery efforts related to the declared emergency from the coronavirus (COVID-19). For purposes of RCW 43.88.055(4), the transfer in this section does not alter the requirement to balance in the ensuing biennia. The appropriation in this section is subject to the following conditions and limitations: the office of financial management must provide monthly updates on spending from this appropriation to the fiscal committees of the legislature; and funding from this section may not be used to supplant existing federal, state, and local funds for services and activities that will assist in the response to the coronavirus (COVID-19). Additionally, agencies and local governments must demonstrate maximum use of available federal funds for coronavirus (COVID-19) response and recovery efforts before seeking funding from this appropriation.

Summary of Latest Version of Bill: No changes were made to the bill.

Bellevue Chamber Weekly Legislative Report: Week 8

Week Overview

General Update

Opposite house fiscal cutoff was on Monday, March 2nd, which means any bill that did not pass out of the fiscal committee in the opposite house by that day is considered dead. There were 482 bills that were alive following Monday’s cutoff. Following fiscal cutoff, attention quickly shifted to floor action where both chambers were on the floor everyday Tuesday through Friday last week, some days going late into the night, in order to pass bills by opposite house floor cutoff on Friday, March 6th. The exception are bills deemed necessary to implement the budget, which are not subject to the cutoff calendar.

Budget negotiations have also been happening in earnest behind the scenes. Negotiators have been working on the operating, capital, and transportation supplemental budgets. The budgets are expected to be unveiled soon in order for final versions to be agreed upon and passed by both chambers before session adjourns on March 12th. The Prevention Alliance has produced a memo on the operating budget comparing the House and Senate proposals. This memo provides helpful context on the budget as we anticipate release of the final budget.

In addition to the budgets, this week the focus will be on working through bills that were amended by the opposite house. When an amended bill is sent back to the house of origin, that chamber can choose to concur with those changes, dispute them, or seek resolution through a conference committee. See the primer below that further explains these processes.

Click here to watch this week’s TVW Week in Review, which provides a good wrap-up of the past week in Olympia.

Electeds & Elections

Rep Norma Smith (R) from the 10th legislative district announced that she will not run for re-election in November. In her announcement, Rep Smith stated that she will be returning to teaching and mentoring. Smith will complete her two-year term, which ends in January 2021. She has served in the legislature since 2008.

Sen Randi Becker (R) from the 2nd legislative district also announced she will not be running for re- election in November. In her announcement, Sen Becker stated that she will be moving to Wyoming with her husband. Becker will complete her term, which ends in January 2021. She has also served in the legislature since 2008. Graham Fire Commissioner Gina Blanchard-Reed and Orting Mayor Josh Penner have both announced their intent to run for the seat left open by Becker’s retirement.

Session Primers

As we go through session, I will periodically do brief primers on things related to session and the legislative process. I often use jargon and things move very quickly, so my goal with these primers is to help you better understand what is going on in Olympia as we go along. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out!

Primer on Concurrence, Dispute, and Conference

If a bill was amended in the opposite house from which it was originally introduced, the house of origin has to decide whether it will concur with the amendments or not. This step must happen before a bill can be sent to the Governor’s desk for signature. Leadership in each chamber decides which bills returned from the opposite house will be discussed and then places them on the concurrence calendar. There are three potential paths for bills that go into concurrence:

  • Concurrence: If the house of origin concurs with the amendments, the bill has passed the legislature and it will head to the Governor.
  • Dispute: If the house of origin disagrees with the amendment(s) from the opposite house, they can ask the opposite house to recede from the amendments. If the opposite house recedes, the bill has passed the legislature and it will head to the Governor.
  • Resolution: If the two houses cannot resolve their differences, they can ask for a conference committee to reach a resolution. Members from each house are selected to meet to discuss the differences. If they agree on what is to be done, the conference committee makes a report. Both houses must adopt the conference report for the bill to pass the If one house does not adopt the conference report (either by vote or inaction), the bill has not passed.

Primer on Timing for Bill Signings

Bills that are delivered to the governor more than five days before the legislature adjourns have five days to be acted on. The governor may decide to sign a bill, veto part of it, or veto all of it. Bills that are delivered fewer than five days before the legislature adjourns have 20 days to be acted on by the governor. The days are counted as calendar days, not business days. Sundays are not counted, but

Saturdays and holidays are. The clock does not start until the bill ‘hits the governor’s desk’. It is important to note that the clock doesn’t start immediately when it passes the legislature. After passage (or concurrence), the bill must be signed by both the Speaker of the House and President of the Senate and then it must be delivered to the governor. Doing this paperwork can sometimes take days, and sometimes it happens very quickly. Once it has been delivered to the governor the clock begins. If the governor does not act on a bill after the allotted number of days, it is as if it were signed. In other words, if the governor doesn’t sign a bill it doesn’t die, it defaults to passing. You can find the schedule for upcoming bill signings here.

Priority Areas

Affordable Housing/Homelessness

Affordable and supportive housing

Rep. Robinson sponsored HB 2797, which amends the local sales tax for affordable or supportive housing by extending the deadline to adopt a resolution of intent to adopt legislation to authorize the tax to July 28, 2020. The deadline to adopt legislation to authorize the tax is extending to December 1, 2020. HB 2797 was heard on February 7th and passed by the House Finance committee on February 11th. The bill passed the House on February 16th with 63-33 vote count. It was heard on February 26th, passed by the Senate Housing Stability and Affordability committee February 28th. It was heard in the Senate Ways & Means on March 2nd and is deemed necessary to implement the budget and therefore not subject to the cutoff calendar.

County fees on the real estate excise tax

Rep. Chopp sponsored HB 2919, which increased the percentage of real estate excise taxes (REET) retained by counties with a population of less than 300,000 to 1.48 percent and directs a portion of the REET retained by King County to go to the maintenance and operations of permanent supportive housing programs. The amended bill states that 25 percent of the REET proceeds retained by King County must go to the maintenance and operations of permanent supportive housing program in the county. The bill was heard on February 26th, amended and passed by the Senate Housing and Affordability committee on February 28th. It was amended to increase the population threshold for counties that retain 1.48 percent of REET taxes for administrative costs less than 300,000 to less than 400,000. It was heard in the Senate Ways & Means on March 2nd and is deemed necessary to implement the budget and therefore not subject to the cutoff calendar.

Excise tax on businesses

A new bill on the King County payroll tax was introduced by Rep Springer and Sen Keiser, HB 2948/SB 6692, which allows the King County council to impose a 0.025% payroll tax on businesses with employees who earn at least $150,000 a year. The money raised would be spent on affordable housing, public safety, homeless services and behavioral health services. Additionally, it allows cities with a population of more than 60,000 to receive 0.01% of the payroll tax. HB 2948 was heard on February 27th and is scheduled for executive session on March 2nd in the House Finance committee. SB 6692 has not yet been scheduled for a hearing in Senate Ways & Means. The bills are considered necessary to implement the budget and therefore not subject to the cutoff calendar.

Multi-family tax exemption

Rep. Walen and Sen. Kuderer introduced HB 2620/SB 6411, which allows cities and counties to designate a residential targeted area and provide property tax exemptions for eligible multi-unit residential housing projects in urban centers. It also allows cities to authorize an additional 12-year extension to housing projects currently receiving a property tax exemption. HB 2620 was amended by House Appropriations and makes several changes, which can be found here. It is currently in House Rules and awaits further action by the House. SB 6411 was amended by Senate Ways & Means and prohibits a city or county from approving applications for new tax-exempt properties in the following calendar year if the city or county fails to meet the reporting requirements provided in statute. It has been placed on the Senate Rules “X” file. Both bills have been deemed “not subject to cut-off” and are still a work in progress.

Rep Macri sponsored HB 2950, which extend the 12-year multi-family property tax exemption to January 2022 only on buildings that are imminently scheduled to lose their exemption and requires the Department of Commerce to convene a stakeholder work group to study and make recommendations of the multi-family property tax exemption program by December 1, 2020. The bill was heard on February 27th, passed by the House Finance committee on March 2nd. The bill passed off the House floor on March 7th with a vote of 93 to 4. It is scheduled for a hearing in Senate Ways & Means on March 9th. The bill has been deemed necessary to implement the budget so is not subject to the cutoff calendar.

Sales tax for affordable housing

Rep. Doglio sponsored HB 1590 during the 2019 session and it retained its present status of 2nd Reading for the 2020 session. The bill authorizes county or city legislative authorities to impose the local sales and use tax for housing and related services and eliminates the requirement that the imposition of the tax be voter approved and instead allows for the tax to be imposed by the county council. The House passed the bill on February 19th with a 52-46 vote count. It was heard and passed on February 27th by the Senate Local Government committee. On March 6th the Senate passed the bill with a 27-21 vote count and now heads to the House for concurrence.

Land Use/GMA

Accessory dwelling units

Sen. Kuderer and Rep. Walen sponsored SB 6231/HB 2630, which provides a 3-year property tax exemption for the construction of an attached or detached accessory dwelling unit. SB 6231 was heard on January 15th and was amended and passed out of the Senate Housing Stability and Affordability committee on January 27th. The amended bill limits the property tax exemption for improvements to single-family dwellings to only include the construction of accessory dwelling units. Both bills were heard in their respective fiscal committees on February 20th. SB 6231 was amended and passed out of Senate Ways & Means on March 2nd. The amended bill restores language from the original bill and requires DOR to evaluate the home-improvement exemption with a report due at the end of 2020. It been referred to Senate Rules for further consideration. HB 2630 was passed by the House Finance on February 27th and has been referred to House Rules for further consideration. The bills are deemed necessary to implement the budget and therefore are not subject to the cutoff calendar.

Sen. Liias introduced SB 6617, which requires counties planning under the Growth Management Act and cities within such counties to authorize up to two accessory dwelling units (ADUs) per lot, to not require the provision of off-street parking for ADUs close to major transit stops, and to not require an owner to occupy an ADU or other housing unit on the lot unless the owner owns more than five ADUs. The bill was amended by the Senate Housing Stability and Affordability committee to expand the owner-occupancy requirements for ADUs to include when the ADU is a short-term rental. SB 6617 was amended on the Senate floor and passed with a 31-17 vote count. The amended bill requires any county planning under the GMA and any city within such county by July 1, 2021, to adopt or amend ordinances, regulations, or other official controls that do not establish a requirement for the provision of off-street parking for ADUs within 0.5 mile of a major transit stop within designates UGAs. By July 1, 2021, the new ADU requirements apply and take effect in any GMA county or city that has not adopted or amended such regulations and supersede, preempt, and invalidate any conflicting local development regulations. The bill was heard on February 25th, amended, and passed by the House Environment and Energy committee on February 27th. The amended bill limits the scope to cities, and provides that ADU requirements and the SEPA appeal exemption does not apply to counties; amends the areas in which cities may require off- street parking associated with the development of ADUs to include areas that are at least ¼ of a mile away from a major transit stop, rather than ½ from a major transit stop; and authorizes cities to require parking associated with an ADU located with ¼ of a mile from a major transit stop if the city has determined that the ADU is in an area with a lack of access to street parking capacity. The bill was amended by the House and passed with a 94-3 vote count. It was amended to limit the scope of ADU policies addressed by the bill to parking-related policies, and amends the areas in which cities may require off-street parking associated with the development of ADUs to include areas that are at least ¼ of a mile away from a major transit stop, rather than ½ of a mile away from a major transit stop. Because it was amended by the House, it now goes back to the Senate for concurrence.

Comprehensive plan updates

Rep. Fitzgibbon sponsored HB 2342, which changes the frequency of comprehensive plan updates under the Growth Management Act from every 8 years to every 10 years. It also requires counties and cities to update certain portions of their comprehensive plans at the 5-year mark between full updates of their comprehensive plans. The bill was amended and passed by the House Environment and Energy committee on February 4th. The amended bill provides small and slow growing cities and counties an extension of 24 months to complete the required 5-year review and possible revision of their comprehensive plans. It was amended by the House to state that the 5-year update requirement is contingent on the appropriation of certain funding amounts in order to defray the expense of the 5-year update and passed unanimously on February 19th. The bill was heard on February 26th and passed by the Senate Environment, Energy and Technology committee on February 27th. It was heard on March 2nd and passed by the Senate Ways and Means committee on March 2nd. The bill was amended by the Senate and passed on March 6th with a 46-3 vote count and now heads to the House for concurrence. It was amended to remove the 10 year extension and the 5 year halfway review requirement and instead extends the next update cycle from 2023 to 2024.

Urban housing supply

Rep. Fitzgibbon sponsored HB 2343 makes changes to last year’s HB 1923 which required certain cities to take certain actions to increase residential building capacity and housing affordability. The bill modifies the list of planning actions certain cities are encouraged to take in order to increase residential building capacity, extends the date by which certain planning actions must be taken in order for those actions to be exempt from administrative or judicial appeal under the GMA and SEPA, and directs the Department of Ecology to initiate a rule-making process to remove parking as an element of the environment and as a component of the environmental checklist. HB 2343 was amended and passed out the House Environment and Energy committee on January 28th. The amended bill changes the date by which certain planning actions must be taken in order for those actions to be exempt from administrative or judicial appeal under the Growth Management Act (GMA) and the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) from April 1, 2021 to April 1, 2023; and changes the frequency of transit service that triggers a cap on minimum residential parking requirements for certain affordable housing units, from four times per hour to two times per hour. The bill passed the House on February 16th with a 93-2 vote count and was heard on February 24th in the Senate Housing Stability and Affordability committee. It was amended and passed by the Senate Housing committee to add quadplexes, sixplexes, stacked flats, and townhouses to two items on the list of actions cities are encouraged to take, and modifies the requirement that the Washington center for real estate research produce a report every 2 years regarding housing supply and affordability metrics for cities planning under the GMA. The bill passed the Senate on March 3rd with a 36- 11 vote count and the House concurred to the changes on March 7th with a 92-5 vote count.

Climate Change and the Environment

Greenhouse gas emissions

Rep. Fitzgibbon introduced HB 1110 during the 2019 legislative session and it directs Department of Ecology (DOE) to adopt a rule establishing a clean fuels program to limit greenhouse gas emissions per unit of transportation fuel energy to 10 percent below 2017 levels by 2028 and 20 percent below 2017 levels by 2035. On January 29th the House took up HB 1110 and after a 4-hour debate passed it with a 52- 44 vote count. The bill was amended and passed by the Senate Environment, Energy and Technology committee on February 25th. It was amended to make the clean fuels program contingent upon enacting a transportation funding act that includes (1) new revenues to the motor vehicle fund and multimodal transportation account that exceed $2 billion dollars and (2) sufficient funding and a plan to complete replacement of the I-5 bridge over the Columbia River and the US 2 trestle. Delays the start date for the clean fuels program one year, from January 1, 2021, to January 1, 2022, or as soon thereafter as the contingent effective conditions occur. The bill was referred to the Senate Transportation committee and heard on March 2nd but was never moved out of committee and is now considered dead.

 

Rep. Slatter sponsored HB 2311 on behalf of Governor Inslee and it revises the 2050 state greenhouse gas emissions reduction limits from 50 percent to 95 percent below 1990 levels and requires the state to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emission. Additionally, it amends greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets for state agencies and requires all agencies to seek all practicable opportunities to cost-effectively maximize carbon sequestration. SHB 2311 modifies the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets for both the state as a whole and for state government, to refer to actual tonnages of greenhouse gas emissions reductions in addition to percentage reductions. The bill was heard in House Appropriations on February 3rd and was amended and passed out of the committee on February 8th. The amended bill adds a reference to "natural and working lands" to intent language regarding increasing carbon sequestration; amends a policy of the state to prioritize "carbon sequestration" rather than "sequestration activities"; And requires all state agencies to seek practicable opportunities to maximize "carbon storage" in addition to "carbon sequestration." 2SHB 2311 passed the House on February 16th with a 55-41 vote count and was heard on February 20th in the Senate Environment, Energy and Technology committee and passed out of committee on February 25th. The bill was heard on February 28th and passed by the Senate Ways & Means on March 2nd. On March 5th, the Senate passed the bill with a 28-21 vote count and now heads to the Governor’s desk for his signature.

Transportation

Transportation Budget Overview

The House released their proposed supplemental transportation budget on February 24th and the Senate released theirs the following day on February 25th. Both budgets had sought to address the passage of Initiative 976, which has resulted in a loss of revenue to the state of $453 million. This loss in revenue increases in magnitude to $684 million in the 2021-23 biennium once fully phased in.

On February 28th, the House passed the transportation budget with a 96-1 vote count and it now heads to the Senate for further consideration. The Senate passed their budget on March 3rd with unanimous support and the transportation budget writers are currently in negotiations and trying to reach agreement.

Automated traffic safety cameras

Sen. Liias and Rep. Fitzgibbon sponsored SB 5789/HB 1793, which establishes a pilot program through the end of 2023 for the use of automated traffic safety cameras on certain state and local roadways in or near downtown Seattle and requires the Seattle City Council to enact an ordinance authorizing their use. During the 2019 session, HB 1793 did pass out of the House in 2019 but ran up against session timelines and did not move out of the Senate. On January 30th the House passed the bill with a 56-40 vote count. It was heard on February 24th and was amended and passed on March 2nd by the Senate Transportation committee. HB 1793 was amended in the Senate Transportation committee to require 50% of the penalty monies to be deposited into the new state Copper Jones Active Transportation Safety Account and 50% to be spend by the city on transportation infrastructure mobility improvements for persons with disabilities. The Senate passed the bill on March 7th with a 27-22 vote count and now heads to the House for concurrence.

SB 5789 was amended and passed by the Senate Transportation on February 10th. The bill was amended to extend the pilot program to June 30, 2023; adjust the location where cameras may be used to 4 miles from the downtown on non-interstate freeways; and requires that an automated traffic safety camera may not use facial recognition technology in real time or after capturing any information. SB 5789 passed the Senate on February 18th with a 25-21 vote count. It was heard in the House Transportation committee on February 29th and passed on March 2nd. The bill did not advance and is now considered dead.

Bicyclists

Sen. Billig introduced SB 6208 allows bicyclists the right to treat a stop sign as a yield. The “safety stop” is described as a rolling stop and increases safety at intersections by allowing a person bicycling to avoid waiting in the blind spot of a motor vehicle and to get out ahead of following motor vehicles, creating space and less likelihood for interaction between the motor vehicle and bicyclists. SB 6208 was amended to replace the term “bicyclists” with the phase “person operating a bicycle” and requires a person operating a bicycle stop for a stop signal displayed by a school bus when the rules of the road require a stop. On February 12th, the Senate passed the bill with a 44-1 vote count and was heard on February 29th and passed by the House Transportation committee on March 2nd. The House passed the bill on March 4th with a 77-20 vote count and now heads to the Governor’s desk for his signature.

Health as a transportation policy goal

Rep. Riccelli sponsored HB 2461, which adds health to the list of transportation policy goals the Department of Transportation must consider for the planning, operation, performance of, and investment in, the state’s transportation system. HB 2461 was amended by the House and passed on February 17th with a 57-41 vote count. The amended bill declared there is a connection between transportation systems and individual’s health rather than the connection between transportation and health is indisputable. It was heard on February 25th in the Senate Transportation committee but did not advance before the opposite house fiscal cutoff and is now considered dead.

Sound Transit

Sen. Liias introduced SB 6606, which requires a regional transit authority that levies a motor vehicle excise tax (MVET) to use new depreciation schedules to determine the value of vehicles; allows vehicle owners to pay the MVET using a Good to Go! Account and to enter into a quarterly or monthly payment plan; and repeals parts of I-976. The bill was passed by the Senate Transportation committee and has been placed on 2nd Reading but has been deemed “not subject to cut-off” and is still a work in progress. The ability for owners to pay for the MVET fees was added to the Senate supplemental transportation budget by requiring the Department of Licensing to implement a pilot program to allow vehicle owners to pay their MVET with a quarterly or monthly payment plan and requires the Department of Licensing and WSDOT to report to the legislature by June 30, 2021 on a recommended approach to allow payment of renewal vehicle registration fees with a Good to Go account for owners subject to MVET fees.

Transportation revenue

Rep. Fey sponsored HB 2913, which increases the gas tax by 9.7 cents over ten years to fund the replacement of state culverts as mandated by the fish passage Supreme Court case. The bill was heard on February 20th in the House Transportation committee but has not been scheduled for executive session. The bill is considered necessary to implement the budget, so is not subject to the cutoff calendar.

Looking Ahead

This week will be focused on concurrence votes for bills changed by the opposite house and conference committees for bills seeking resolution. The final capital, transportation, and operating budgets will be released and passed by each chamber leading up to sine die on Thursday, March 12th.

Bellevue Chamber Bill Status Report

 

Bill # Abbrev. Title Short Description Status Sponsor
HB 2194 Transp. budget adjustments Restricting executive discretion in adjusting transportation budgets. H Trans Walsh
HB 2227

(SB 6031)

Vehicle taxes & fees Limiting state and local taxes, fees, and other

charges relating to vehicles.

H Trans Young
HB 2285 Road maintenance/planning Elevating road maintenance and preservation in transportation planning. H Trans McCaslin
2SHB 2310 (SB 6399) On-demand transp. emissions Reducing emissions from vehicles associated with on-demand transportation

services.

 

S Transportation

 

Fitzgibbon

ESHB 2322 (SSB 6497) Transp. budget, supplemental Making supplemental transportation appropriations for the 2019-2021 fiscal

biennium.

 

S Passed 3rd

 

Fey

HB 2323 Motor vehicle sales tax Dedicating the state sales tax on motor vehicles for transportation. H Finance MacEwen
HB 2362

(SB 6652)

Local transportation

revenue

Addressing local transportation revenue

options.

H Trans Ramos
EHB 2461

(SB 6452)

Transp. system goals/health Including health in the state transportation system policy goals. S Transportation Riccelli
SHB 2620 (2SSB 6411) Multiple-unit dwellings/tax Expanding the property tax exemption for new and rehabilitated multiple-unit dwellings in urban growth areas.  

H Rules C

 

Walen

HB 2630 (2SSB 6231) Accessory dwelling units/tax Providing a limited property tax exemption for the construction of accessory dwelling

units.

 

H Rules R

 

Walen

SHB 2649 Homeless shelter capacity Concerning homeless shelter capacity. H Rules C Ryu
HB 2659

(SB 6350)

Vehicle taxes & fees Limiting state and local taxes, fees, and other charges relating to vehicles. H Trans Young
HB 2667 (SB 6681)  

Energy code/residential

Increasing housing access and affordability by decreasing construction costs associated with implementing the Washington state

energy code for residential buildings.

 

H Local Govt

 

Chapman

HB 2692

(SB 6597)

Vehicle combinations Concerning vehicle combinations that may be operated on public highways. H Trans Doglio
EHB 2797

(SSB 6631)

Housing/sales & use

tax

Concerning the sales and use tax for

affordable and supportive housing.

S Ways & Means Robinson
SHB 2907 (SB 6669) County business excise tax Authorizing counties with populations over two million to impose an excise tax on

business.

 

H Rules R

 

Macri

HB 2913 Transportation revenue Concerning transportation revenue. H Trans Fey

 

HB 2914 Transportation funding bonds Authorizing bonds for transportation funding. H Trans Fey
HB 2918 Peer-to-peer car

sharing

Concerning transportation. H ConsPro&Bus Corry
ESHB 2919 REET county fees Adjusting the amount and use of county fees on the real estate excise tax. S Ways & Means Chopp
HB 2945 (SB 6690) Aerospace B&O taxes/WTO Concerning aerospace business and occupation taxes and world trade

organization compliance.

 

H 2nd Reading

 

Sullivan

 

 

 

HB 2948 (SB 6692)

 

 

 

Local tax authority/housing

Granting additional and progressive tax authority for counties with populations exceeding two million and cities therein to impose an excise tax on businesses that addresses the affordable housing crisis and reduces homelessness through evidence- based practices that will save lives and improve public safety, while also ensuring

certainty and predictability for businesses.

 

 

 

H Finance

 

 

 

Springer

HB 2949 Transit passes/higher ed. Requiring transit passes to be provided by certain entities. H Trans Macri
 

 

SHB 2950

 

 

Housing tax exemption

Addressing affordable housing needs through the multifamily housing tax exemption by providing an extension of the exemption until January 1, 2022, for certain properties currently receiving a twelve-year

exemption and by convening a work group.

 

 

H Passed 3rd

 

 

Macri

 

SHB 2957

 

Greenhouse gases/indirect

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions by providing authority for the regulation of indirect sources under the clean air act and implementing standards and programs that

reduce emissions associated with buildings.

 

H Rules R

 

Fitzgibbon

HJR 4211

(SJR 8218)

Property tax relief Amending the state Constitution to provide property tax relief. H Finance Gregerson
SB 6031

(HB 2227)

Vehicle taxes & fees Limiting state and local taxes, fees, and other charges relating to vehicles. S Transportation Fortunato
SB 6108 RTA taxes, nullifying Nullifying certain taxes approved by regional transit authority voters. S Transportation O'Ban
SB 6145

(HB 2222)

Property tax reduction Reducing the property tax. S Ways & Means Warnick
 

SB 6187

 

Data breaches/SSN

Modifying the definition of personal information for notifying the public about data breaches of a state or local agency system.  

H Passed 3rd

 

Zeiger

2SSB 6231 (HB 2630)  

Single-family dwellings

Providing a limited property tax exemption for the construction of accessory dwelling

units.

 

S Rules 2

 

Kuderer

SB 6245 Vehicle taxes & fees Limiting state and local taxes, fees, and other charges relating to vehicles. S Transportation O'Ban
SB 6350

(HB 2659)

Vehicle taxes & fees Limiting state and local taxes, fees, and other charges relating to vehicles. S Transportation Fortunato

 

2SSB 6411 (SHB 2620) Multiple-unit dwellings/tax Expanding the property tax exemption for

new and rehabilitated multiple-unit dwellings in urban growth areas.

 

S Rules X

 

Das

SB 6452

(EHB 2461)

Transp. system goals/health Including health in the state transportation system policy goals. S Transportation Billig
SB 6462 Local income taxes Reaffirming the prohibition of the

imposition of a local income tax.

S Ways & Means O'Ban
SSB 6497

(ESHB 2322)

Transp. budget, supplemental Making supplemental transportation

appropriations for the 2019-2021 fiscal biennium.

 

S Rules 2

 

Hobbs

SSB 6586 Electric vehicles/per

mile

Implementing a per mile charge on electric

and hybrid vehicles.

S Rules 2 Saldaña
 

SB 6595

 

Condo & HOA dues, value

Making condominium and homeowner association dues allocated based on the assessed value of each condominium or home as a percentage of the total value of all

units or lots in the association.

 

S Law & Justice

 

Lovelett

SB 6597

(HB 2692)

Vehicle combinations Concerning vehicle combinations that may be operated on public highways. S Transportation Sheldon
SSB 6606 Regional transit authorities Concerning regional transit authorities. S 2nd Reading Liias
SSB 6628 Greenhouse gas/fossil fuels Concerning emissions of greenhouse gases. S Rules 2 Carlyle
SSB 6630 Public housing authorities Increasing accountability for public housing authorities. S Rules X Zeiger
SSB 6631

(EHB 2797)

Housing/sales & use

tax

Concerning the sales and use tax for

affordable and supportive housing.

S Ways & Means Saldaña
SB 6652

(HB 2362)

Local transportation revenue Addressing local transportation revenue options. S Transportation Nguyen
SB 6677 Transp benefit district

fees

Restoring voter-approved transportation

benefit district vehicle fees.

S Transportation Lovelett
SB 6680 Affordable housing funding Providing a local government option for the funding of essential affordable housing

programs.

 

S Housing Stabil

 

Lovelett

SB 6681 (HB 2667)  

Energy code/residential

Increasing housing access and affordability by decreasing construction costs associated with implementing the Washington state

energy code for residential buildings.

 

S Environment, En

 

Van De Wege

SB 6690 (HB 2945) Aerospace B&O taxes/WTO Concerning aerospace business and occupation taxes and world trade organization compliance.  

S Rules 2

 

Liias

 

 

 

SB 6692 (HB 2948)

 

 

 

Local tax authority/housing

Granting additional and progressive tax authority for counties with populations exceeding two million and cities therein to impose an excise tax on businesses that addresses the affordable housing crisis and reduces homelessness through evidence- based practices that will save lives and improve public safety, while also ensuring

certainty and predictability for businesses.

 

 

 

S Ways & Means

 

 

 

Keiser

 

Bellevue Chamber Weekly Legislative Report: Week 7

Week Overview

General Update

The past week was packed with every type of session activity. The flurry started on Monday when the Senate released their proposed operating budget and the House released their proposed operating, capital and transportation budgets. It was anticipated the House was going to release their proposed operating budget first, but the Senate unexpectedly released theirs a couple of hours ahead of the House. It is not typical for both chambers to release their budgets on the same day, so the compressed timeline for release was an added complexity. The next day, the Senate released their proposed transportation budget (they had already released their capital budget the previous week). The fiscal committee executive sessions on the operating budget bills went until about midnight for each chamber as the committees worked through numerous proposed amendments to the bills. Both operating budgets were debated and voted off their respective chamber floors later in the week. Links and updates on other budgets are provided in the budget section below.

In addition to the activity around budgets, it was also a packed week of hearings. With opposite house policy cutoff on Friday, February 28th, the week was full of policy hearings and executive sessions to move bills out of committee by cutoff. Opposite house fiscal cutoff is on Monday, March 2nd, which means there are just three days to hear and move bills referred to a fiscal committee. The House Appropriations,  Senate Ways and Means, and House Transportation committees all convened on Saturday for a full day of hearings. No committees met on Sunday, so there will be a marathon of executive sessions in fiscal committees on Monday to move bills out by cutoff.

Click here to watch this week’s TVW Week in Review, which provides a good wrap-up of the past week in Olympia.

Budgets

There was a lot of activity around all of the budgets this week. Below is a summary of the status of each budget and links to relevant documents.

  • Operating Budget:
    • The House operating budget passed out of House Appropriations on February 25th and passed off the House floor on February 28th with a vote of 55 to 39. Documents related to the House operating budget can be found here.
    • The Senate operating budget passed out of Senate Ways & Means on February 26th and passed off the Senate floor on February 27th with a vote of 33 to 16. Documents related to the Senate operating budget can be found here.
  • Capital Budget:
    • The House capital budget passed out of the House Capital Budget committee on February 27th. It has been referred to House Rules and awaits being pulled to the floor for debate and vote. Documents related to the House capital budget can be found here.
    • The Senate capital budget passed out of the Senate Ways and Means committee on February 21st  and unanimously off the Senate floor on February 26th. Documents related to the   Senate capital budget can be found here.
  • Transportation Budget:
    • The House transportation budget passed out of the House Transportation committee on February 26th and passed off the House floor on February 28th with a vote of 96-1. Documents related to the House transportation budget can be found here.
    • The Senate transportation budget passed out of the Senate Transportation committee on February 27th. It has been referred to Senate Rules and awaits being pulled to the floor for debate and vote. Documents related to the Senate transportation budget can be found here.

Electeds & Elections

Representative Beth Doglio (22nd LD) announced that she will be joining the race for the 10th

Congressional District, which is open as the result of Congressman Denny Heck’s retirement. Doglio was first elected to the state legislature in 2016. The other Democratic candidates for the 10th CD race are former Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland; former state Rep. Kristine Reeves of Federal Way; Phil Gardner, a former district director for Heck; and Joshua Collins, a socialist running under the Democratic banner.

Session Primers

As we go through session, I will periodically do brief primers on things related to session and the legislative process. I often use jargon and things move very quickly, so my goal with these primers is to help you better understand what is going on in Olympia as we go along.

A Primer on the X-Files

You may have seen activity on some bills late this week saying they have been moved to the House or Senate Rules ‘X’ File. After certain cut-off dates, the Rules Committee sometimes places bills in the x-file if they are no longer available for consideration (aka dead). Bills placed in the x-file are removed from all calendars and daily status sheets.

Priority Areas

Affordable Housing/Homelessness

Affordable and supportive housing

Rep. Robinson sponsored HB 2797, which amends the local sales tax for affordable or supportive housing by extending the deadline to adopt a resolution of intent to adopt legislation to authorize the tax to July   28, 2020. The deadline to adopt legislation to authorize the tax is extending to December 1, 2020. HB  2797 was heard on February 7th and passed by the House Finance committee on February 11th. The bill passed the House on February 16th with 63-33 vote count. It was heard on February 26th, passed by the Senate Housing Stability and Affordability committee February 28th. It is scheduled for a hearing in Senate Ways & Means on March 2nd.

County fees on the real estate excise tax

Rep. Chopp sponsored HB 2919, which increased the percentage of real estate excise taxes (REET) retained by counties with a population of less than 300,000 to 1.48 percent and directs a portion of the REET retained by King County to go to the maintenance and operations of permanent supportive housing programs. The amended bill states that 25 percent of the REET proceeds retained by King County must go to the maintenance and operations of permanent supportive housing program in the county. The bill was heard on February 26th, amended and passed by the Senate Housing and Affordability committee on February 28th. It was amended to increase the population threshold for counties that retain 1.48 percent

of REET taxes for administrative costs less than 300,000 to less than 400,000. It is scheduled for a hearing in Senate Ways & Means on March 2nd.

Excise tax on businesses

A new bill on the King County payroll tax was introduced by Rep Springer and Sen Keiser, HB 2948/SB 6692, which allows the King County council to impose a 0.025% payroll tax on businesses with employees who earn at least $150,000 a year. The money raised would be spent on affordable housing, public safety, homeless services and behavioral health services. Additionally, it allows cities with a population of more than 60,000 to receive 0.01% of the payroll tax. HB 2948 was heard on February 27th and is scheduled for executive session on March 2nd in the House Finance committee. SB 6692 has not yet been scheduled for a hearing in Senate Ways & Means. The bills are considered necessary to implement the budget and therefore not subject to the cutoff calendar.

Multi-family tax exemption

Rep. Walen and Sen. Kuderer introduced HB 2620/SB 6411, which allows cities and counties to designate a residential targeted area and provide property tax exemptions for eligible multi-unit residential housing projects in urban centers. It also allows cities to authorize an additional 12-year extension to housing projects currently receiving a property tax exemption. HB 2620 was amended by House Appropriations and makes several changes, which can be found here. It is currently in House Rules and awaits further action by the House. SB 6411 was amended by Senate Ways & Means and prohibits a city or county from approving applications for new tax-exempt properties in the following calendar year if the city or county fails to meet the reporting requirements provided in statute. It has been placed on the Senate Rules “X” file. Both bills have been deemed “not subject to cut-off” and are still a work in progress.

Rep Macri sponsored HB 2950, which extend the 12-year multi-family property tax exemption to January 2022 only on buildings that are imminently scheduled to lose their exemption and requires the Department of Commerce to convene a stakeholder work group to study and make recommendations of the multi-family property tax exemption program by December 1, 2020. The bill was heard on February 27th and scheduled for executive session on March 2nd in the House Finance committee.

Sales tax for affordable housing

Rep. Doglio sponsored HB 1590 during the 2019 session and it retained its present status of 2nd Reading for the 2020 session. The bill authorizes county or city legislative authorities to impose the local sales and use tax for housing and related services and eliminates the requirement that the imposition of the tax be voter approved and instead allows for the tax to be imposed by the county council. The House passed the bill on February 19th with a 52-46 vote count. It was heard and passed on February 27th by the Senate Local Government committee and referred to the Rules committee for further consideration.

Land Use/GMA

Accessory dwelling units

Sen. Kuderer and Rep. Walen sponsored SB 6231/HB 2630, which provides a 3-year property tax exemption for the construction of an attached or detached accessory dwelling unit. SB 6231 was heard on January 15th and was amended and passed out of the Senate Housing Stability and Affordability committee on January 27th. The amended bill limits the property tax exemption for improvements to single-family dwellings to only include the construction of accessory dwelling units. Both bills were heard in their respective fiscal committees on February 20th. SB 6231 is scheduled for executive session in

Senate Ways & Means on March 2nd. HB 2630 was passed by the House Finance on February 27th and has been referred to House Rules for further consideration.

Sen. Liias introduced SB 6617, which requires counties planning under the Growth Management Act and cities within such counties to authorize up to two accessory dwelling units (ADUs) per lot, to not require the provision of off-street parking for ADUs close to major transit stops, and to not require an owner to occupy an ADU or other housing unit on the lot unless the owner owns more than five ADUs. The bill was amended by the Senate Housing Stability and Affordability committee to expand the owner-occupancy requirements for ADUs to include when the ADU is a short-term rental. SB 6617 was amended on the Senate floor and passed with a 31-17 vote count. The amended bill requires any county planning under   the GMA and any city within such county by July 1, 2021, to adopt or amend ordinances, regulations, or other official controls that do not establish a requirement for the provision of off-street parking for ADUs within 0.5 mile of a major transit stop within designates UGAs. By July 1, 2021, the new ADU requirements apply and take effect in any GMA county or city that has not adopted or amended such regulations and supersede, preempt, and invalidate any conflicting local development regulations. The bill was heard on February 25th, amended, and passed by the House Environment and Energy committee on February 27th. The amended bill limits the scope to cities, and provides that ADU requirements and the SEPA appeal exemption does not apply to counties; amends the areas in which cities may require off- street parking associated with the development of ADUs to include areas that are at least ¼ of a mile away from a major transit stop, rather than ½ from a major  transit  stop; and  authorizes  cities  to require parking associated with an ADU located with ¼ of a mile from a major transit stop if the city has determined that the ADU is in an area with a lack of access to street parking capacity. The bill has been referred to House Rules for further consideration.

Climate change in the growth management act

Rep. Duerr introduced HB 2427, which adds climate change to the planning goals that guide the development and adoption of city and county comprehensive plans and development regulation under the Growth Management Act. HB 2427 was amended and passed by the House Environment and Energy committee on February 4th. The amended bill removes references to vehicle miles traveled and by requiring jurisdictions to develop and implement plans, polices, and strategies that help achieve emission reductions limits, rather than by requiring jurisdictions to ensure that plans, policies, and strategies adopt to and mitigate the effects of a changing climate. Additionally, it limits the applicability of the climate change goal to counties required to develop a GMA review and evaluation program or to counties with a population of at least 300,000 and to the cities within those counites. The bill was amended by the House to require the Office of Financial Management (OFM) to contract with researchers at the UW or WSU for a report to be submitted to the Legislature by July 1, 2021, that assesses ecological and salmonid impacts of urban heat island effects from cities with a population of at least 100,000 and passed with 59-37 vote count. The bill was heard on February 25th in the Senate Local Government committee, but did not move forward before opposite house policy cut-off and is now considered dead.

Comprehensive plan updates

Rep. Fitzgibbon sponsored HB 2342, which changes the frequency of comprehensive plan updates under the Growth Management Act from every 8 years to every 10 years. It also requires counties and cities to update certain portions of their comprehensive plans at the 5-year mark between full updates of their comprehensive plans. The bill was amended and passed by the House Environment and Energy committee on February 4th. The amended bill provides small and slow growing cities and counties an

extension of 24 months to complete the required 5-year review and possible revision of their comprehensive plans. It was amended by the House to state that the 5-year update requirement is contingent on the appropriation of certain funding amounts in order to defray the expense of the 5-year update and passed unanimously on February 19th. The bill was heard on February 26th and passed by the Senate Environment, Energy and Technology committee on February 27th. It has been scheduled for a hearing in Senate Ways and Means on March 2nd.

Urban housing supply

Rep. Fitzgibbon sponsored HB 2343 makes changes to last year’s HB 1923 which required certain cities to take certain actions to increase residential building capacity and housing affordability. The bill modifies the list of planning actions certain cities are encouraged to take in order to increase residential building capacity, extends the date by which certain planning actions must be taken in order for those actions to be exempt from administrative or judicial appeal under the GMA and SEPA, and directs the Department of Ecology to initiate a rule-making process to remove parking as an element of the environment and as a component of the environmental checklist. HB 2343 was amended and passed out the House Environment and Energy committee on January 28th. The amended bill changes the date by which certain planning actions must be taken in order for those actions to be exempt from administrative or judicial appeal under the Growth Management Act (GMA) and the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) from April 1, 2021 to April 1, 2023; and changes the frequency of transit service that triggers a cap on minimum residential parking requirements for certain affordable housing units, from four times per hour to two times per hour. The bill passed the House on February 16th with a 93-2 vote count and was heard on February 24th in the Senate Housing Stability and Affordability committee. It was amended and passed by the Senate Housing committee to add quadplexes, sixplexes, stacked flats, and townhouses to two items on the list of actions cities are encouraged to take, and modifies the requirement that the Washington center for real estate research produce a report every 2 years regarding housing supply and affordability metrics for cities planning under the GMA. The bill has been referred to the Senate Rules committee for further consideration.

Climate Change and the Environment

Greenhouse gas emissions

Rep. Fitzgibbon introduced HB 1110 during the 2019 legislative session and it directs Department of Ecology (DOE) to adopt a rule establishing a clean fuels program to limit greenhouse gas emissions per unit of transportation fuel energy to 10 percent below 2017 levels by 2028 and 20 percent below 2017 levels by 2035. On January 29th the House took up HB 1110 and after a 4-hour debate passed it with a 52- 44 vote count. The bill was amended and passed by the Senate Environment, Energy and Technology committee on February 25th. It was amended to make the clean fuels program contingent upon enacting a transportation funding act that includes (1) new revenues to the motor vehicle fund and multimodal transportation account that exceed $2 billion dollars and (2) sufficient funding and a plan to complete replacement of the I-5 bridge over the Columbia River and the US 2 trestle. Delays the start date for the clean fuels program one year, from January 1, 2021, to January 1, 2022, or as soon thereafter as the contingent effective conditions occur. The bill was referred to the Senate Transportation committee and is scheduled for a hearing on March 2nd.

Rep. Slatter sponsored HB 2311 on behalf of Governor Inslee and it revises the 2050 state greenhouse gas emissions reduction limits from 50 percent to 95 percent below 1990 levels and requires the state to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emission. Additionally, it amends greenhouse gas emissions reduction

targets for state agencies and requires all agencies to seek all practicable opportunities to cost-effectively maximize carbon sequestration. SHB 2311 modifies the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets for both the state as a whole and for state government, to refer to actual tonnages of greenhouse gas emissions reductions in addition to percentage reductions. The bill was heard in House Appropriations on February 3rd and was amended and passed out of the committee on February 8th. The amended bill adds a reference to "natural and working lands" to intent language regarding increasing carbon sequestration; amends a policy of the state to prioritize "carbon sequestration" rather than "sequestration activities"; And requires all state agencies to seek practicable opportunities to maximize "carbon storage" in addition to "carbon sequestration." 2SHB 2311 passed the House on February 16th with a 55-41 vote count and was heard on February 20th in the Senate Environment, Energy and Technology committee and passed out of committee on February 25th. The bill was heard in Senate Ways & Means on February 28th and scheduled for executive session on March 2nd.

Transportation

Transportation Budget Overview

The House released their proposed supplemental transportation budget on February 24th and the Senate released theirs the following day on February 25th. Both budgets had sought to address the passage of Initiative 976, which has resulted in a loss of revenue to the state of $453 million. This loss in revenue increases in magnitude to $684 million in the 2021-23 biennium once fully phased in.

House-Proposed

Supplemental Transportation Budget

Senate-Proposed

Supplemental Transportation Budget

Total Proposed 2019-21 Budget

$10.2 billion

$10.5 billion

Total increase in appropriation from budget passed last

session

$350 million

$664 million

Links to documents

Narrative Summary Agency Summary Report Agency Detail Report

Budget Bill - PSHB 2322

Narrative Summary Appropriation Summary Appropriation Detail

Budget Bill – PSSB 6497

On February 28th, the House passed the transportation budget with a 96-1 vote count and it now heads to the Senate for further consideration.

Automated traffic safety cameras

Sen. Liias and Rep. Fitzgibbon sponsored SB 5789/HB 1793, which establishes a pilot program through the end of 2021 for the use of automated traffic safety cameras on certain state and local roadways in or near downtown Seattle and requires the Seattle City Council to enact an ordinance authorizing their use. During the 2019 session, HB 1793 did pass out of the House in 2019 but ran up against session timelines and did not move out of the Senate. On January 30th the House passed the bill with a 56-40 vote count. It was heard on February 24th and is scheduled for executive session on March 2nd in the Senate Transportation committee. SB 5789 was amended and passed by the Senate Transportation on February 10th. The bill was amended to extend the pilot program to June 30, 2023; adjust the location where cameras may be used to 4 miles from the downtown on non-interstate freeways; and requires that an

automated traffic safety camera may not use facial recognition technology in real time or after capturing any information. SB 5789 passed the Senate on February 18th with a 25-21 vote count. It was heard in the House Transportation committee on February 29th and is scheduled for executive session on March 2nd.

Bicyclists

Sen. Billig introduced SB 6208 allows bicyclists the right to treat a stop sign as a yield. The “safety stop” is described as a rolling stop and increases safety at intersections by allowing a person bicycling to avoid waiting in the blind spot of a motor vehicle and to get out ahead of following motor vehicles, creating space and less likelihood for interaction between the motor vehicle and bicyclists. SB 6208 was amended to replace the term “bicyclists” with the phase “person operating a bicycle” and requires a person operating a bicycle stop for a stop signal displayed by a school bus when the rules of the road require a stop. On February 12th, the Senate passed the bill with a 44-1 vote count and was heard on February 29th in the House Transportation committee and is scheduled for executive session on March 2nd.

Fish passage barriers

Rep. Barkis introduced HB 2503, which adds tribal governments to the entities that the state Fish Passage Barrier Removal Board (Board) must coordinate with, to the extent the tribal governments are willing to participate and choose to share certain information; requires the Board to prepare a prioritized list of fish passage barrier removal projects every even-numbered year until 2031, and allows WSDOT to only undertake fish passage barrier removal projects on the list, necessary for completion of another WSDOT project, or as directed in statute or an appropriations acts; and creates the Fish Passage Barrier Removal Account, which is allowed to keep its interest, and limits expenditures from the account to fish passage barrier removal projects on WSDOT’s land or on the Board’s list. The bill was heard on February 20th in the House Transportation committee and has not been scheduled for executive session at this time.

Health as a transportation policy goal

Rep. Riccelli sponsored HB 2461, which adds health to the list of transportation policy goals the Department of Transportation must consider for the planning, operation, performance of, and investment in, the state’s transportation system. HB 2461 was amended by the House and passed on February 17th with a 57-41 vote count. The amended bill declared there is a connection between transportation systems and individual’s health rather than the connection between transportation and health is indisputable. It was heard on February 25th in the Senate Transportation committee, but has not been scheduled for executive session at this time.

Sound Transit

Sen. Liias introduced SB 6606, which requires a regional transit authority that levies a motor vehicle excise tax (MVET) to use new depreciation schedules to determine the value of vehicles; allows vehicle owners to pay the MVET using a Good to Go! Account and to enter into a quarterly or monthly payment plan; and repeals parts of I-976. The bill was passed by the Senate Transportation committee and has been placed on 2nd Reading but has been deemed “not subject to cut-off” and is still a work in progress.

Transportation revenue

Rep. Fey sponsored HB 2913, which increases the gas tax by 9.7 cents over ten years to fund the replacement of state culverts as mandated by the fish passage Supreme Court case. The bill was heard on February 20th in the House Transportation committee but has not been scheduled for executive session. The bill is considered necessary to implement the budget, so is not subject to the cutoff calendar.

Looking Ahead

Monday will be focused on moving bills out of their fiscal committee by the March 2nd opposite house fiscal cutoff. Then attention will quickly shift to floor action as each chamber works to move bills off the floor by Friday’s opposite house floor cutoff.

Upcoming Dates:

  • March 2nd - Opposite House Fiscal Cutoff
  • March 6th - Opposite House Floor Cutoff
  • March 12th - Sine Die

Bellevue Chamber Bill Status Report

Bill #

Abbrev. Title

Short Description

Status

Sponsor

HB 2194

Transp. budget adjustments

Restricting executive discretion in adjusting transportation budgets.

H Trans

Walsh

HB 2227

(SB 6031)

Vehicle taxes & fees

Limiting state and local taxes, fees, and other charges relating to vehicles.

H Trans

Young

HB 2285

Road maintenance/planning

Elevating road maintenance and preservation in transportation planning.

H Trans

McCaslin

2SHB 2310

(SB 6399)

On-demand transp. emissions

Reducing emissions from vehicles associated with on-demand transportation services.

S Transportation

Fitzgibbon

ESHB 2322 (SSB 6497)

Transp. budget, supplemental

Making supplemental transportation appropriations for the 2019-2021 fiscal biennium.

H Passed 3rd

Fey

HB 2323

Motor vehicle sales tax

Dedicating the state sales tax on motor vehicles for transportation.

H Finance

MacEwen

HB 2362

(SB 6652)

Local transportation revenue

Addressing local transportation revenue options.

H Trans

Ramos

EHB 2461

(SB 6452)

Transp. system goals/health

Including health in the state transportation system policy goals.

S Transportation

Riccelli

SHB 2620

(2SSB 6411)

Multiple-unit dwellings/tax

Expanding the property tax exemption for

new and rehabilitated multiple-unit dwellings in urban growth areas.

H Rules C

Walen

HB 2630 (SSB 6231)

Accessory dwelling units/tax

Providing a limited property tax exemption for the construction of accessory dwelling units.

H Rules R

Walen

SHB 2649

Homeless shelter capacity

Concerning homeless shelter capacity.

H Rules C

Ryu

HB 2659

(SB 6350)

Vehicle taxes & fees

Limiting state and local taxes, fees, and other charges relating to vehicles.

H Trans

Young

HB 2692

(SB 6597)

Vehicle combinations

Concerning vehicle combinations that may be operated on public highways.

H Trans

Doglio

EHB 2797

(SSB 6631)

Housing/sales & use tax

Concerning the sales and use tax for

affordable and supportive housing.

S Ways & Means

Robinson

SHB 2907 (SB 6669)

County business excise tax

Authorizing counties with populations over

two million to impose an excise tax on business.

H Rules R

Macri

HB 2913

Transportation revenue

Concerning transportation revenue.

H Trans

Fey

HB 2914

Transportation funding bonds

Authorizing bonds for transportation funding.

H Trans

Fey

ESHB 2919

REET county fees

Adjusting the amount and use of county fees on the real estate excise tax.

S Ways & Means

Chopp

HB 2945 (SB 6690)

Aerospace B&O taxes/WTO

Concerning aerospace business and occupation taxes and world trade organization compliance.

H Rules R

Sullivan

HB 2948 (SB 6692)

Local tax authority/housing

Granting additional and progressive tax authority for counties with populations exceeding two million and cities therein to impose an excise tax on businesses that addresses the affordable housing crisis and reduces homelessness through evidence- based practices that will save lives and improve public safety, while also ensuring

certainty and predictability for businesses.

H Finance

Springer

HB 2949

Transit passes/higher ed.

Requiring transit passes to be provided by certain entities.

H Trans

Macri

HB 2950

Housing tax exemption

Addressing affordable housing needs through the multifamily housing tax exemption by providing an extension of the exemption until January 1, 2022, for certain properties currently receiving a twelve-year exemption

and by convening a work group.

H Finance

Macri

HJR 4211

(SJR 8218)

Property tax relief

Amending the state Constitution to provide property tax relief.

H Finance

Gregerson

SB 6031

(HB 2227)

Vehicle taxes & fees

Limiting state and local taxes, fees, and other

charges relating to vehicles.

S Transportation

Fortunato

SB 6108

RTA taxes, nullifying

Nullifying certain taxes approved by regional transit authority voters.

S Transportation

O'Ban

SB 6145

(HB 2222)

Property tax reduction

Reducing the property tax.

S Ways & Means

Warnick

SB 6187

Data breaches/SSN

Modifying the definition of personal information for notifying the public about data breaches of a state or local agency

system.

H Rules R

Zeiger

SSB 6231 (HB 2630)

Accessory dwelling units/tax

Providing a limited property tax exemption for the construction of accessory dwelling

units.

S Ways & Means

Kuderer

SB 6245

Vehicle taxes & fees

Limiting state and local taxes, fees, and other charges relating to vehicles.

S Transportation

O'Ban

SB 6350

(HB 2659)

Vehicle taxes & fees

Limiting state and local taxes, fees, and other

charges relating to vehicles.

S Transportation

Fortunato

SB 6452

(EHB 2461)

Transp. system goals/health

Including health in the state transportation system policy goals.

S Transportation

Billig

SB 6462

Local income taxes

Reaffirming the prohibition of the imposition of a local income tax.

S Ways & Means

O'Ban

SSB 6497

(ESHB 2322)

Transp. budget, supplemental

Making supplemental transportation

appropriations for the 2019-2021 fiscal biennium.

S Rules 2

Hobbs

SSB 6586

Electric vehicles/per mile

Implementing a per mile charge on electric and hybrid vehicles.

S Rules 2

Saldaña

SB 6597

(HB 2692)

Vehicle combinations

Concerning vehicle combinations that may be

operated on public highways.

S Transportation

Sheldon

SSB 6606

Regional transit authorities

Concerning regional transit authorities.

S 2nd Reading

Liias

SSB 6628

Greenhouse gas/fossil

fuels

Concerning emissions of greenhouse gases.

S Rules 2

Carlyle

SSB 6631

(EHB 2797)

Housing/sales & use tax

Concerning the sales and use tax for affordable and supportive housing.

S Ways & Means

Saldaña

SB 6652

(HB 2362)

Local transportation revenue

Addressing local transportation revenue options.

S Transportation

Nguyen

SB 6677

Transp benefit district fees

Restoring voter-approved transportation benefit district vehicle fees.

S Transportation

Lovelett

SB 6690 (HB 2945)

Aerospace B&O taxes/WTO

Concerning aerospace business and occupation taxes and world trade organization compliance.

S Ways & Means

Liias

SB 6692 (HB 2948)

Local tax authority/housing

Granting additional and progressive tax authority for counties with populations exceeding two million and cities therein to impose an excise tax on businesses that addresses the affordable housing crisis and reduces homelessness through evidence- based practices that will save lives and improve public safety, while also ensuring

certainty and predictability for businesses.

S Ways & Means

Keiser

SJR 8218

(HJR 4211)

Property tax relief

Amending the state Constitution to provide property tax relief.

S Ways & Means

Stanford

January 26, 2020

Bellevue Chamber Weekly Legislative Report: Week 2

Week Overview

General Update

Last week was another busy week filled with committee hearings on bills and some floor action in both chambers. A lot of advocates and constituents took the opportunity of the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday on Monday to come to Olympia and visit their legislators.

Almost 1,500 bills have been introduced so far this session. This is in addition to all of the bills that failed to pass last year during the first year of the biennium. Bills need to pass out of their house of origin policy committee by February 7th or they will be considered dead, unless they are deemed Necessary to Implement the Budget. This means there is a great sense of urgency to get bills heard and voted out of committee quickly. A majority of bills will not make it past the first cutoff.

Click here to watch this week’s TVW Week in Review, which provides a good wrap-up of the past week in Olympia.

Session Primers

As we go through session, I will periodically do brief primers on things related to session and the legislative process. We often use jargon and things move very quickly, so our goal with these primers is to help you better understand what is going on in Olympia as we go along. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out.

Executive Session

Executive session is when members of a committee decide whether they think a bill should move out of committee and continue on through the legislative process. During executive session amendments and substitute bills can be introduced and voted on by the committee. While executive sessions are open to public viewing and aired on TVW just like bill hearings, only committee members and staff are permitted to speak. The simple way of describing executive session is that the members of a committee vote and if a bill gets a simple majority in favor, it passes out of committee and is referred to the next appropriate step in the process.

In the Senate, members vote orally, but their vote is subject to signature. This means committee members are free to sign or remove their signature from a committee vote until the bill has passed out of committee and has been acted on by the floor, or until the cut-off date, whichever happens first. It is the signature (not the oral vote) that serves as the official voting record reported on bill reports. One-sixth of the committee may demand an oral roll call.

Voting in committee hearings is handled slightly different in the House. In the House every committee vote on bills is taken by oral yeas and nays, and (unlike in the Senate) this oral vote is recorded. A majority recommendation must also be signed in the committee meeting room, where members are not required to sign the way they voted orally. Again, the official voting record is the committee report with signatures, which can change from what was recorded during the oral vote.

You can see the official record of committee vote on the bill page. Under the line that says, “Executive action taken in XX committee”, you will see up to three lines: ‘Majority; do pass’, ‘Minority; do not pass’, and ‘Minority; without recommendation’. There will be a hyperlink next to each of these lines that you can click on to see which members voted within each of these recommendations.

Priority Areas

Affordable Housing/Homelessness

On Tuesday, the Senate Republicans introduced a package of bills aimed at reducing the number of homeless individuals on the streets, utilizing a number of tools to expand resources, compel homeless individuals to seek treatment for mental health disorders and substance abuse, and require proper enforcement of laws on the books when a homeless individual commits a crime.

  • SB 6109, allows local governments to appoint a guardian like a family member, social worker, or another person to exercise power of attorney on behalf of a homeless individual struggling with mental health or substance abuse. SB 6109 is scheduled for public hearing Jan. 31 before the Senate committee on Behavioral Health subcommittee to Health & Long Term Care;
  • SB 6196, creates a homeless impact grant program that would provide money to county and city chambers of commerce locates in areas with a homeless population of greater than 500 people;
  • SB 6201, reduces the real estate excise tax for multi-unit housing;
  • SB 6364, incentivizes housing developers to construct more single-family affordable housing by instituting a tiered fee structure based on square footage per bedroom of each home. SB 6364 is scheduled for public hearing Jan. 27 before the Senate Committee on Housing Stability & Affordability;
  • SB 6386, reduces impact fees for low-income housing. SB 6386 was heard Jan. 22nd before the Senate Committee on Housing Stability & Affordability;
  • SB 6387, allows a property developer to have their impact fees returned if the city or county does not spend those dollars within 6 years instead of the current 10 years. SB 6387 is scheduled for public hearing Jan. 27th before the Senate committee on Housing Stability & Affordability;
  • SB 6388, caps the impact fees paid for multi-family housing to the amount paid for single-family homes. SB 6388 is scheduled for public hearing Jan. 27th before the Senate committee on Housing Stability & Affordability;
  • SB 6185, expands opportunities for potential homeowners to acquire down payment assistance. SB 6185 was heard Jan. 15 before the Senate committee on Housing Stability & Affordability; and
  • SB 6502, removes local prosecutors’ authority to prosecute someone acquitted of a “homeless crime” if that person is released once.

Homeless shelter capacity

Rep. Ryu sponsored HB 2649 at the request of Governor Inslee, which directs cities over 15,000 and counties to revise the 5-yer plans to address homelessness to increase sanctioned encampment or homeless shelter capacity by the equivalent of 50% of the capacity needed to shelter the population living outdoors identified by the point in time county or other processes. The bill is scheduled for a hearing on January 28th and executive session on January 31st in the House Housing, Community Development and Veterans committee.

Just Cause

Rep. Macri and Sen. Kuderer introduced HB 2453/SB 6379, which seeks to improve landlord-tenant

relationships by requiring landlords to cite a reason to move someone out of a home. HB 2453 was heard on January 24th and is scheduled for executive session on January 31st in the House Civil Rights and Judiciary committee. and SB 6379 has not been scheduled for a public hearing at this time.

Councilmember Marx testified on the bill on January 24th.

Multi-family tax exemption

Rep. Walen and Sen. Kuderer introduced HB 2620/SB 6411, which allows cities and counties to designate a residential targeted area and provide property tax exemptions for eligible multi-unit residential housing projects in urban centers. It also allows cities to authorize an additional 12 year extension to housing projects currently receiving a property tax exemption. SB 6411 was heard on January 22nd in the Senate Housing Stability and Affordability committee and HB 2620 has not been scheduled for a public hearing at this time.

Sales tax for affordable housing

Sen. Hunt introduced SB 6126, which allows the local sales and use tax for affordable housing to be imposed by councilmanic authority rather than by a majority of voters. The bill also removes an outdated provision that required cities in King County to wait until October of 2015 before submitting a local sales and use tax for affordable housing to city voters. The bill was heard on January 14th, passed out of the Senate Local Government committee on January 23rd, and has been passed to House Rules committee for second reading.

Tenant Protections

Sen. Kuderer and Rep. Macri introduced SB 6378/HB 2724, which modifies the uniform 14-day pay or vacate notice; authorizes the stay of an unlawful detainer judgement if the tenant will be able to pay the judgement with emergency rental assistance funds; requires the tenant to provide a copy of the pledge of emergency rental assistance to stay the judgement and for the landlord documentation necessary to process such assistance; removes the prohibition on eligibility for judicial discretion if a tenant is issued three or more 14-day notices within the previous 12-month period; prohibits landlords from insinuating or threatening eviction for the tenant’s failure to pay nonpossessory fees; and, requires landlords to alter the rent due date when requested by the tenant in writing and the tenant primary source of income is regular, monthly governmental assistance received after rent is due. SB 6378 was heard on January 17th and is scheduled for executive session on January 27th in the Senate Housing Stability and Affordability committee and HB 2724 has not yet been scheduled for a hearing at this time.

Unrelated persons occupying a home

Sen. Rolfes introduced SB 6302, which prohibits local governments from limiting the number of unrelated persons occupying a home. The bill was heard on January 20th in the Senate Housing Stability and Affordability committee and is scheduled for executive session on January 29th.

Land Use/GMA

Accessory dwelling units

Rep. Gregerson introduced HB 2570, which creates a statewide mandate to remove certain regulatory barriers to facilitate the construction of accessory dwelling units (ADU). The bill creates a statewide standard for accessory dwelling units by requiring one ADU on all lots zoned for single family homes, removes the provision requiring off-street parking, and removes owner occupancy requirements. It also pre-empts local governments from adopting any different standards. The bill is scheduled for a public hearing on January 28th in the House Environment and Energy committee.

Sen. Kuderer and Rep. Walen sponsored SB 6231/HB 2630, which provides a 3-year property tax exemption for the construction of an attached or detached accessory dwelling unit. SB 6231 was heard on January 15th and is scheduled for executive session on January 27th in the Senate Housing Stability and Affordability committee and HB 2630 has not been scheduled for a public hearing at this time.

Climate change in the growth management act

Sen. Salomon and Rep. Duerr introduced SB 6335/HB 2609, which adds a climate change goal and climate change and natural hazards resiliency element to the planning requirements of the Growth Management Act for certain counties and cities within those counties. It also requires the Department of Commerce to establish a share of greenhouse gas emissions reductions for these jurisdictions as part of the planning.

Additionally, it extends deadlines to 2025 for comprehensive plan reviews by counties and cities within those counties that were due in 2023 and 2024. SB 6335 was heard on January 21st in the Senate Local Government committee and HB 2609 is scheduled for a public hearing on January 28th in the House Environment and Energy committee.

Sen. Salomon and Rep. Duerr also introduced SB 6453/HB 2427, which adds climate change to the planning goals that guide the development and adoption of city and county comprehensive plans and development regulation under the Growth Management Act. SB 6453 was heard on January 21st in the Senate Local Government committee and HB 2427 was heard on January 23rd in the House Environment and Energy committee.

Comprehensive plan updates

Rep. Fitzgibbon sponsored HB 2342, which changes the frequency of comprehensive plan updates under the Growth Management Act from every 8 years to every 10 years. It also requires counties and cities to update certain portions of their comprehensive plans at the 5 year mark between full updates of their comprehensive plans. The bill was heard on January 23rd in the House Environment and Energy committee.

Urban housing supply

Rep. Fitzgibbon and Sen. Salomon sponsored HB 2343/SB 6334 makes changes to last year’s HB 1923 which required certain cities to take certain actions to increase residential building capacity and housing affordability. The bill modifies the list of planning actions certain cities are encouraged to take in order to increase residential building capacity, extends the date by which certain planning actions must be taken in order for those actions to be exempt from administrative or judicial appeal under the GMA and SEPA, and directs the Department of Ecology to initiate a rule-making process to remove parking as an element of the environment and as a component of the environmental checklist. HB 2343 was heard on January 16th and is scheduled for executive session on January 28th in the House Environment and Energy committee. SB 6334 is scheduled for a public hearing on January 27th in the Senate Housing Stability and Affordability committee.

Climate Change and the Environment

Greenhouse gas emissions

Rep. Fitzgibbon and Sen. Saldaña introduced HB 1110/SB 5412 during the 2019 legislative session and it directs Department of Ecology (DOE) to adopt a rule establishing a clean fuels program to limit greenhouse gas emissions per unit of transportation fuel energy to 10 percent below 2017 levels by 2028 and 20 percent below 2017 levels by 2035. During the 2019 legislative session, HB 1110 passed the House but was not able to move out of the Senate Transportation committee before the end of the session. SB 5412 was heard on January 16th in the Senate Environment, Energy and Technology committee.

Sen. Das and Rep. Slatter sponsored SB 6272/HB 2311 on behalf of Governor Inslee and it revises the 2050 state greenhouse gas emissions reduction limits from 50 percent to 95 percent below 1990 levels and requires the state to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emission. Additionally, it amends greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets for state agencies and requires all agencies to seek all practicable opportunities to cost-effectively maximize carbon sequestration. SB 6272 was heard on January 21st in the Senate Environment, Energy and Technology committee and HB 2311 was heard on January 14th and moved out of the House Environment and Energy committee on January 23rd. The bill was amended to modify the greenhouse gas emission reduction targets for both the state as a whole and for state government, to refer to actual tonnages of greenhouse gas emissions reductions in addition to percentage reductions.

Transportation

The House and Senate transportation budget writers are routinely meeting to discuss how to deal with I- 976 impacts. The initiative is projected to reduce state transportation funding by about $454 million in the current biennium and by more than $1.9 billion over six years. In addition, total revenue losses for local governments and Sound Transit are projected at more than $2.3 billion over six years. We do not know when we will see a proposal but will make sure to keep you updated once a proposal is made public.

Automated traffic safety cameras

Sen. Liias and Rep. Fitzgibbon sponsored SB 5789/HB 1793, which allows for red light cameras to be used to detect one or more of the following violations: stopping when traffic obstructed; stopping at intersection or crosswalk; public transportation only lane; stopping, standing, or parking at locations restricted for emergency response vehicle entry or exit of the boarding or disembarking or public transportation vehicles. During the 2019 session, HB 1793 did pass out of the House but ran up against session timelines and did not move out of the Senate. SB 5789 was been scheduled for a public hearing on January 28th in the Senate Transportation committee.

Bicyclists

Sen. Billig and Rep. Fitzgibbon introduced SB 6208/HB 2358, allows bicyclists the right to treat a stop sign as a yield. The “safety stop” is described as a rolling stop and increases safety at intersections by allowing a person bicycling to avoid waiting in the blind spot of a motor vehicle and to get out ahead of following motor vehicles, creating space and less likelihood for interaction between the motor vehicle and bicyclists. SB 6208 was heard on January 21st in the Senate Transportation committee and HB 2358 was heard on January 22nd in the House Transportation committee.

Health as a transportation policy goal

Rep. Riccelli and Sen. Billig sponsored HB 2461/SB 6452, which adds health to the list of transportation policy goals the Department of Transportation must consider for the planning, operation, performance of, and investment in, the state’s transportation system. HB 2461 was heard on January 22nd in the House Transportation committee and SB 6452 has not been scheduled for a public hearing at this time.

Sound Transit

Sen. Liias introduced SB 6606, which changes the motor vehicle valuation schedule Sound Transit has been using under ST 3 to a valuation schedule based on purchase price and repeals I-976. The bill has not been scheduled for a hearing at this time.

Transportation policy goals

Rep. Shewmake and Sen. Saldaña introduced HB 2688/SB 6398, which requires any state transportation funding project lists to undergo an evaluation and meet certain metrics. HB 2688 was heard on January 22nd in the House Transportation committee and SB 6398 is scheduled for a public hearing on January 28th in the Senate Transportation committee.

Looking Ahead

This week will see more public hearings and movement of bills out of committee.

Upcoming Dates:

  • February 7th - House of Origin Policy Cutoff
  • February 11th - House of Origin Fiscal Cutoff
  • February 19th - House of Origin Floor Cutoff
  • February 28th - Opposite House Policy Cutoff
  • March 2nd - Opposite House Fiscal Cutoff
  • March 6th - Opposite House Floor Cutoff
  • March 12th - Sine Die

Bellevue Chamber Bill Status Report

Bill #

Abbrev. Title

Short Description

Status

Sponsor

HB 2194

Transp. budget adjustments

Restricting executive discretion in adjusting transportation budgets.

H Trans

Walsh

HB 2227

(SB 6031)

Vehicle taxes & fees

Limiting state and local taxes, fees, and other charges relating to vehicles.

H Trans

Young

HB 2285

Road maintenance/planning

Elevating road maintenance and preservation in transportation planning.

H Trans

McCaslin

HB 2310 (SB 6399)

On-demand transp. emissions

Reducing emissions from vehicles associated with on-demand transportation services.

H Env & Energy

Fitzgibbon

HB 2322 (SB 6497)

Transp. budget, supplemental

Making supplemental transportation appropriations for the 2019-2021 fiscal biennium.

H Trans

Fey

HB 2323

Motor vehicle sales tax

Dedicating the state sales tax on motor vehicles for transportation.

H Finance

MacEwen

HB 2461

(SB 6452)

Transp. system goals/health

Including health in the state transportation system policy goals.

H Trans

Riccelli

Membership Inquiry